Disabled sports

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    How Social Constructionism Theory Affects Disabled Sport Programs Social constructionism is a method of ability of society and correspondence that inspects the advancement of collectively developed understanding of the world (Galbin, 2014). Social constructionism theory claims that due to socialization and experiences, people conclude certain meanings of others, objects and incidents (Young & Collin, 2004). Subsequently the nature of social blend and a social set of rules, shows that the population in the social, political and economic realm can make anything to get prominent or inconspicuous. Social constructionism theory is pertinent to the people living with disabilities and success of their games. If society continues to be perceptive…

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    The similarities that I have with the clients are we’re family oriented, religious, lived in our own homes/apartments, active within our communities, and married or in a relationships. There were also difference between us. The differences included being intellectually and developmentally disabled, elderly, had different ethnic backgrounds (Caucasian) and male. However, throughout our differences, our similarities connects us and reminds me how we all are human with similar goals and outlooks on…

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    In addition, discrimination and stereotypes would be prevented if we open the sports industry to more individuals like transgender and disabled athletes. With co-ed sports, there would not only be boys and girls participating but, as they get older there will be transgender and disabled athletes participating. The power of co-ed sports would allow this to occur because both genders would come together to make this come true and make them feel welcomed and comfortable with their surroundings. In…

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    Tryouts Persuasive Essay

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    Imagine walking in the shoes in the shoes of a disabled or special needs child. You are very shy and you do not have many friends, but you really want to join the basketball, football, or cheerleading team. Then, tryouts come and you are too nervous to try out because tryouts themselves are overwhelming and stressful. What do you do? Do you not tryout? Your dreams will be ruined and your sports career could end forever. Some might say that special needs students should participate in regular…

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    paralyzed ! I will not be able to play sports anymore! Actually, you can, due to all of the new wheelchair inventions we have enabled physically chal l enged athletes to play sports. There are all kinds of different wheelchairs for differe n t sports including: football, tennis, basketball, hockey, rugby, and more! These wheelchairs also allow disabled athletes to play in tournaments like the Olympics! All of this is possible because the sports chairs are made of light metals, allowing…

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    requiring students to participate in a sport, in order for students to build a healthy relationship with physical activity. However, forced participation in school sports does not create positive attitudes towards physical activity for many students. The requirement of school sports would instead creating a breeding ground for feelings such as frustration and resentment towards physical activity, especially for students who are not athletically inclined. Sports also pose a variety of both…

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    Self-Esteem In Sports

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    conduct, for instance, healthier dietary patterns and inclusion in sport, while low self-esteem is joined with dysfunctional behavior and nonappearance of prosperity (Fox, 1998, 2000a). One of the…

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    About 95% of people in America are involved in some form of sporting activity – recreationally and competitively – as of 2013 . $25.4 billion US dollars is spent on average per annum on professional sports in its various forms . Competitive sport, undeniably, has a strong vice-grip on today’s society in the United States and all across the world; and inequality is an issue that has plagued society from the past, and despite continuous efforts to reduce its presence, has yet to be eradicated.…

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    functional capabilities of people with physical disabilities. In sports, the primary motive of this technology is to even the playing field; that is, to give the disabled athlete a way to match the mechanical capabilities of the able-bodied athlete. At the college level, many athletes with prosthetics or other assistive technologies compete alongside the able-bodied. However, in elite sports, such as in the Olympics, able-bodied athletes are typically separated from disabled athletes. On one…

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    is really scary. When it occurs in an organized sport that is supposed to be a safety haven for an enjoyable activity then it can be a tragedy. If the proper equipment is utilized then the risk of injuries decreases and safety is improved. Children or teen-agers that get injured while playing an organized sport may benefit from rules and regulations that are designed to protect players. Many of the injuries that can occur are very dangerous, sometimes even life-threatening, and can possibly…

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