Attention management

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    Stroop Effect Lab Report

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    One’s Innate Tendency to Read Words Saipriya Sagiraju University of Massachusetts Amherst Abstract Directed attention is a mechanism used by humans every day to manage their thoughts by inhibiting a stimuli in order to say or do something else; this tendency is also known as the Stroop effect. To test the effects of the Stroop task we conducted an experiment to examine if words on silhouettes have an effect on the reaction time of verbalizing the names of the animals on a silhouette sheet. We…

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    observe attention. Whether I am observing myself slowly lose my ability to focus on my instructors or observing a fellow student staring blankly into space while the instruction continues to give their lecture. While it would be nice to be able to give 100% of my attention to my instructors’ lectures, it is impossible to do so because attention is limited in both time and capacity. There is also an observable difference in students that engage in selective attention and divided attention.…

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    Multi-tasking and Observation demonstrated the concept that attention is limited. After observing a strange, it was clear that people could not focus their attentions on more than one tasks at a time. In our lecture the concepts the Capacity Theory and the Dual Task was discussed about. The Capacity Theory is the idea that cognitive resources are divided amongst the task an individual pays attention to. In other words, our brain has limited attention to what we can focus to. This theory…

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    Question Change blindness is defined by Matlin as the failure to detect a change in an object or a scene and inattentional blindness is the failure to notice an unexpected and completely visible stimuli while focusing attention on other aspects in a scene (Matlin, 48). Simons and Chabris address the role similarity has between the unexpected and attended events with regard to detection (1999). Simons and Chabris are also looking at the frequency of strange or unusual instances being detected…

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    Background: Selective and exaggerated attention towards threat, termed attention bias (AB), has been identified as a core behavioral and neurocognitive mechanism in anxiety (Bar-Haim et al., 2010). AB is commonly quantified through the dot probe (DP) paradigm in which neutral and threatening faces compete for attention (Mathews & MacLeod, 2002). Another commonly-used measure of AB is the Posner spatial cueing paradigm in which neutral and threatening words serve as valid and invalid cues (Posner…

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    at a price. I would say that this is a very urgent matter and I even found some of Carr 's evidence a bit unsettling. How we gain knowledge is mostly shaped by the way we access it, we can see that our current generation does not exactly have the attention span to go trough an interesting article or book that may help them discover something new, instead most of them would rather get distracted by the immense amount of entertainment that the internet provides. I say this because I was a bit…

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    teaching with no sort of interaction the student would zone out and find the learning the material boring. Especially when working in an elementary school, some students have short attention span so they are going to lose focus. If the subject, they are learning sounds uninteresting kids would not want to pay attention or listen. Everyone must attend school until the age of eighteen. That is a lot of years and for students to want to look forward to all those years, teachers need to help by…

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    unable to perform as well as the other child. One activity that really caught my attention was a dancing activity. After lunch, the teacher projected some music and…

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    Plato's Ion Analysis

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    In the current world of art, it seems that inspiration and imitation are separated by only a thin line. Someone could present what they made based off inspiration, but critics can accuse it to be merely a copy of someone’s else work. These differences in perceptive seems to be a reoccurring argument that lasted the centuries. One of the most famous work that demonstrate this conflict is Plato’s Ion. This written dialogue between Greek philosopher Socrates and professional rhapsode Ion dives into…

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    How well is our brain able to focus and not let distractors get in the way? Through results of flanker tasks, it seems that our brain is not that good with ignoring distractors. This leads to a debate on whether top down processes are used in both targets and interfering distractors in flanker tasks or if bottom up processes are used. In a research article, titled “Top-Down Processes Override Bottom-up Interference in the Flanker Task” by Rotem Avital-Cohen and Yehoshua Tsal, it is clear that…

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