Ribosomal RNA

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    A genotypic method uses molecular techniques to identify bacteria by doing DNA or RNA analysis of the bacterium’s genome ("Conventional Bacterial Identification Methods", 2013). The 16S rRNA gene sequences provides species-specific signature sequences useful for bacterial identification ("16S Ribosomal RNA Sequencing Theory”, 2016). The 16s rRNA gene sequence uses a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify a specific DNA target from a mixture of DNA molecules, which helps in the identification of bacterial colonies when comparing to sequencing templates ("polymerase chain reaction / PCR | Learn Science at Scitable", 2016). Results: All the results will have a designated guideline to being classified as a “clean” sample or an unacceptable sample. The designated guideline for a clean sample is <20 colonies per plates. The results of not wearing a mask show the total average of colonies per plate is 241. Both of these results show…

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    KOH String Test Lab Report

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    obtain some bacteria from our fingerprints and different locations around the Biology Building. My partner and I examined our bacterial colonies that grew from the cells collected. We selected a single colony of the unknown bacteria from a fingerprint. We set up a PCR reaction to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, of the bacterial genome. To do that we prepared a small liquid culture of our bacteria (Leicht, 2015). . We scrapped the bacterial colony with a toothpick and transferred into the…

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    activity of the microbial community, and the abundance of some key microbial groups, than the purely abundance or culture based techniques discussed previously. However, there is still a lack of specificity when examining microbial groups of interest. Therefore, overreliance on these techniques will once again prevent us from functionally linking changes in bioturbation, changes in microbial community and activity, and the overall change in the processes of interest. Genetic analysis can provide…

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    In a marker paper written by the NIH HMP Working Group, Jane Peterson, Susan Garges, et al in 2009 it was stated that the aims of the project were to study variation in human microbiome. Some of the features that would be used for analysis were population, genotype, disease, nutrition, medication as well as environment and influence on disease. The key findings of the project would later be placed in a database that would be available to the scientific community. Hence sometimes the human…

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    PCR is a common practice used to amplify a certain region of DNA. In this experiment, PCR was used to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the bacteria. This locus was used because it is one that evolves slowly in bacteria. A Taq polymerase is used for this PCR because of the temperatures the reaction goes through. The16S rRNA primers used in this PCR, are complimentary to sequences conserved in all bacteria and will target sites of variation. These sites of variation were the regions of the…

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    Protein Synthesis Paper

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    This paper is going to describe the replication of DNA and RNA and the processes of transcription and translation of protein synthesis. What is DNA? DNA is a nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in cells and some viruses, consisting of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA sequences are replicated by the cell prior to cell division and may include genes,…

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    Rna Synthesis Essay

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    transcriptional machinery of RNA Polymerase I in the oocyte Experimental Approach: Aim1: To address the roles of the Hira complex in rRNA transcription and embryonic development The Hira histone chaperone complex is an evolutionarily conserved complex, which is composed of Hira, Ubn1 and Cabin1, and cooperates with the histone chaperone Asf1a to mediate H3.3-specific binding and chromatin deposition12,13. I previously demonstrated the critical roles of maternal Hira /H3.3 on paternal…

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    3.05 Dna Research Paper

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    RNA polymerase attaches itself to a template of DNA and then go into base pairing, synthesizes mRNA or messenger RNA. This is called transcription, as the DNA code being transcribed into mRNA code. RNA replaces Thymine for Uracil during base pairing. 4. mRNA leaves the nucleus and enters the cytoplasm this goo like part of the cell where ribosomes can be found. 5. Ribosomes are involved in protein synthesis, in other words they create proteins. 6. mRNA attaches one end to a ribosome, and through…

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    Eukaryotic Synthesis

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    Transcription is considered to be the first step of gene expression. It is known to be the process of making a copy of genetic information stored in a DNA strand into a complementary strand of messenger RNA (mRNA). The process of eukaryotic transcription can be separated into three phases, initiation, elongation and termination. This complex process involves various cell signaling methods as well as the activity of many enzymes. Genes are segments of DNA nucleotides located on a chromosome…

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    The relationship between central dogma and a genetic code The vital sequence of different processes that transfers the genetic code from DNA via mRNA to finally form the functional product (finished proteins) together forms the central dogma of modern molecular biology. Thus, the genetic code is the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology. Central dogma is nothing but the flow of genetic information in all living cells including human cells from DNA to RNA to proteins. The central dogma…

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