Supersessionism

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    THE FULFILLMENT OF TIME Prior to the birth of Jesus Christ, the people of Israel awaited the long begot promise of the Messiah. During their waiting they had undergone severe persecution, due to their historically continued disobedience and violation of their covenant with God. Having their homes destroyed, belongings seized, they were taken into captivity repeatedly by a multitude of nations, only to be mistreated and enslaved. Not to mention, their beloved temple was decimated repeatedly. Adding to their woe’s, the Israelites lived under the law and the after- effects of living under strict regulation in order to survive and maintain purity as a chosen nation. Oppression also came at the hands of self-righteous leaders whom changed the law to suit their selfish ambitions and fuel their own personal desires, due to the repeated violations of the covenant. Although grace had not been manifest, God in His sovereignty had predestined grace and salvation for the nation of Israel. The grace of God is evidenced through the prophetic proclamation of the Old Testament prophets, who repeatedly spoke of the coming of Christ. Therefore, the fullness of time spoken of in Galatians 4:4 harmonizes with the proclamations as divinely inspired by the Spirit of God. Providentially, man had proven that he was unable to keep the covenant established by God, and God honouring His covenant He established with Abraham, demonstrated his love and grace through his son Jesus Christ through…

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    John Calvin came up with covenant theology to cover the over all flow of the bible. The first time Covenant Theology was really used was in the 16th and 17th centuries by Ursinus, Olevianus and Cocceius. This theology was used mainly by the Reformed Churches and was it 's predominant theology around the 17th and 19th centuries. Covenant Theology is a system of theology that views God 's dealings with man in respect of covenants rather than dispensations (periods of time). It represents the whole…

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    One reading the bible it is important to look for themes that can be found throughout the scripture to understand the importance of them. A main theme that can be traced can be understood as a main point to understand the character of God. One of those main themes as to do with covenants theology. It can be said that through covenants God expresses his desires on his people in the most clear form. This paper will be looking at what is a covenant, where can they be found in the bible and how do…

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    The overall theological message or themes seen throughout the book of Exodus can be divided into four major identities. These four consists of liberation, law, covenant, and presence . Based off of these four themes, it is seen that God is supreme over all of the nations, but in particular Israel is his people, and God will continue to preserve them by actions expressed and appropriated generation to generation . This is expressed as seeing God as a god of history who comes into being through…

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    The Bible is the instructions of God given to Christians and followers of Jesus Christ. The Bible is consisted of sixty-six books written by nearly forty authors. Through those authors, readers are taught there is four acts of the Bible; the creation, the fall, the redemption, and the restoration. The Bible records many covenants between human beings. The making of covenants often included signs as well. A covenant is a binding agreement or contract between God and his people. Most significant…

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    King Saul began his reign as an obedient nagid king, leading the people in covenant faithfulness toward God. He soon changed to a melek king, seeking his own glory and power. This change brought civil strife, division, and death upon God's people, instead of the shalom Israel was to experience. Because of this, Saul and his dynasty were rejected by God. Saul’s background and early life reflect that he had the potential to be a nagid king. Saul complied with the rules a king must obey. Saul was…

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    Introduction How many times have we all heard the saying, “it’s a woman’s’ prerogative to change her mind”? In looking at the Ancient Israelites and the journey they took through the Old Testament I see a lot of swaying back and forth in being close to God and then far away from God. So if there’s anyone else that can be likened to this indecisiveness of changing ones mind, it is the Ancient Israelites. Body The Old Testament is full of people’s relationship with God . Genesis is the…

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    Anne Hutchinson was raised on the ideas of the typical Puritan theology. This theology believed that God originally established a covenant with Adam specifying that firm obedience of God’s law would result in salvation. After the fall, humanity sank into sin until God formed a second covenant with Abraham. Because post-Lapserian man could not abide by a covenant of works, God established a covenant of grace whereby certain individuals were preordained as the spiritually elect, but were concealed…

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    Saul And David Analysis

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    God imparts a lesson on rulers both secular and theocratic by allowing the people of Israel to defy His wishes that He would be their only God and leader. God allows them to be led by a king, albeit one whose appointment comes with His approval. God conveys a lesson in the books of Samuel, to all rulers that can be seen through a close comparison of the two kings He chooses, Saul and David. The decisions, motivations, and experiences had by these kings show significant differences and the…

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    The story of Israel’s conquest of Canaan can, like many of the other stories of the Hebrew Bible, can be explained as reflections of the religious, political, and societal beliefs of their composers and editors. As a historical piece, the account of Israel’s conquest of Canaan fails to match the current archeological understanding of the Canaanite settlements mentioned in The Book of Joshau. The inaccuracies fail to reflect an accurate historical model, but they suggest that the Book of Joshua…

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