History of ancient Israel and Judah

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    During the time of the 8th-6th century periods of BCE, Judah and Israel had an ongoing rival lasting for almost two hundred years. Bordered North and South, this rivalry would come to blows and both were dealt with invasions; not only from each other but also from foreign empires. It was also at this time Judah and Israel kingdoms were on opposite directions. Judah had begun to maintain a steady growth and prosperity where Israel was on a path to begin a steady downfall of their reign and kingdom. With the rise of religious power of Jerusalem, Israel was subjected to a downfall in population as refugees began to flee to Jerusalem. “A pattern of growth-rebellion-destruction-regrowth characterized Judah during the next century.” (ACT 2) King…

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    For much of history, Israel and Judah have been thought of as a single cultural entity with occasional political differences. That is, they both stemmed from one kingdom, called Israel, and remained culturally connected after the united Kingdom divided into the northern and southern kingdoms. However, historians are now beginning to study Israel and Judah as both separate kingdoms and separate cultures. Although they do share many traditions, it has become clear that studying these two kingdoms…

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    Song 2 8-17 Analysis

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    The exposition reflected that the passage was meant to transmit the core values and beliefs of ancient biblical Israelite community towards God, humanity, and creation given that the Song has been preserved, reshaped, and refined over period of centuries through both oral and written tradition. Moreover, this passage not only celebrates sexual love but also life itself as it is lived by ancient Israelite culture that values and cares for humans, animals and nature as part of the community’s…

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    a woman’s’ prerogative to change her mind”? In looking at the Ancient Israelites and the journey they took through the Old Testament I see a lot of swaying back and forth in being close to God and then far away from God. So if there’s anyone else that can be likened to this indecisiveness of changing ones mind, it is the Ancient Israelites. Body The Old Testament is full of people’s relationship with God . Genesis is the beginning of the Old Testament where God created the heavens and the…

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    Book Of Micah

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    better future, and proofs of God’s faithfulness to the final covenant: Jesus. A few of the oracles are harsh judgments on Israel and Judah. Most of Micah’s indictment against Israel, Samaria, and Judah are based upon injustices, especially toward the powerless—unfair treatment of women and children, corrupt business affairs, and rulers who live in luxury as their people suffer. Israel’s rulers and prophets had become corrupt. The book prophesizes the destruction of the cities of Judah, Samaria,…

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    Minor Prophet Amos Essay

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    When reading the Old Testament, particular attention must be paid to the context. Amos was a sheepherder and did not belong to a family of prophets, according to the book of his name. Yet, God called him to speak to Israel. He was one of the twelve Minor Prophets, active during the reign of Jeroboam II in Israel in the 8th century BCE. Therefore, an exegesis is important in order to distinguish what a particular passage meant to the people at the time it was first heard. Amos is the thirtieth…

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    Babylonian Exile Analysis

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    briefly analyse the political situation in the ancient near east prior to the arrival of the Babylonians in Israel and Judah. The experiment with luxury and power of the great eastern kingdoms had ended in disaster for Israel. King Solomon created the wealthiest and most powerful central government the Hebrews would ever see, but he did so at an extremely high cost. He gave land away to pay for his lavishness and he forced many of his people to labour camps. Solomon is believed to have passed…

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    Essay On Babylonian Exile

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    rites, and temples. This Babylonian exile had major consequences for the people of Judah and Israel. This exile was enormous at this time period and also changed history. The Ancient land of Babylonia becomes the centre of Jewish life at the very time that Palestine is declining’. In 604 Nebuchadnezzar II became king of Babylonian, he was perceived as one of the world’s best kings of the ancient world. Another term for Babylonians was Chaldean, which was used when they were sent to deport the…

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    Appearing in late 1800AD, Panbabylonism was developed by several European scholars and historians such as Friedrich Delitzsch, Fritz Hommel, Eduard Stucken, Hugo Winckler, Peter Jensen, Felix Peiser, Heinrich Zimmern, Alfred Jeremias and Ferdinand Bork that many of the stories from the Old Testament specifically the Book of Genesis originated from the religion, mythology and history of the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians and Assyrians who lived in the Mesopotamia Valley from 5500BC to 220AD. …

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    Rise Of Judaism Essay

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    The history of those who practice Judaism is one that pre-dates Christianity. The history of Judaism is traced as far back as Abraham. The Hebrew Bible tells us that, Yahweh and Abraham had made covenant. In the covenant Yahweh promises Abraham land known as Canaan, the promise land, and an abundance of descendants. The descendants later become to be known as the children of Israel after Jacob, Abraham’s grandson that Yahweh renames as Israel. The people of Israel reside in Canaan until famine…

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