Spectroscopy

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    Infrared Spectroscopy

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    criminal investigations, which can be aided by infrared spectroscopy. IR spectroscopy deals with the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This region is light with a longer wavelength and lower frequency than visible light. (Wikipedia) IR Spectroscopy is a method to identify substances based on their absorption of infrared wavelengths. It is a study of how the molecules of substances can absorb infrared radiation and convert it into heat. (Cole) A machine called an infrared spectrometer applies infrared rays to a substance to record the number of wavelengths absorbed by said substance. (Cole) This works because of covalent bonds within substances. These bonds can be viewed as stiff springs that can be stretched and bent. (Ki) They vibrate at different amounts of energy and at a frequency that depends on the mass of the atom and strength of the bond. (Ki) the mass is larger, the frequency is lower. Also, stronger bonds yield higher frequencies. (Ki)…

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    Spectroscopy And Molarity

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    the solution. Scientists accomplish this by using the technique of spectroscopy; spectroscopy can be defined as the science affiliated with the spectra produced when matter interacts with light. Lab 7 investigation 19, “What Factors Affect the Intensity of Color?” expands on the process of spectroscopy, and its relation to the molarity of a substance. The goal of this lab was to determine the effects of the intensity of color of a solution (2). Spectroscopy is frequently used in the medical…

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    Spectroscopy Essay

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    Types of Spectroscopy used in Organic Chemistry 1.1 Introduction Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between matter and light (electromagnetic radiation) (Crouch & Skoog, 2007). It is often phrased as the light of knowledge (Reusch, 2013). In the past, spectroscopy started by the study of visible light dispersed according to its wavelength by a prism (Anon., n.d.). Now, with the knowledge of light having both wave-like and particle-like characteristics, with given frequency or…

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    Spectroscopy is the study of objects, which is represented on the spectrum of color they radiate. An interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Spectroscopy involves the process of absorption, emission, or scattering of electromagnetic radiation by either ions, atoms, or molecules. The process of absorption involves when light is absorbed by electrons that jump to higher energy levels. On the other hand, emission spectra are established when the electrons from high energy levels give…

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    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a tool to study thermal emission resulting from non-radiative relaxation followed by absorption of radiation. PAS was studied primarily by Alexander Graham Bell, John Tyndall, Wilhelm Rontgen and Lord Rayleigh in 1884. For the history of PAS, was not until 1975 that photoacoustic spectroscopy started to be used as a wide range of different applications. This technique provides the following main advantages over the known types of spectroscopy. The advantages…

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    Light spectroscopy has become an incredibly useful tool in analyzing the structure and composition of compounds. Specifically, the principles of absorption, the process by which an electron absorbs radiation to excite from a lower energy state to a higher energy state, and fluorescence, the emission of photons when a material is subjected to radiation, allow for the identification and analysis of unknown concentrations of compounds.1 With that being said, the purpose of this experiment is to…

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    Column Chromatography Lab

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    The only compounds that were used for this plate were the spearmint oil, standard for carvone, and the carvone product. The solvent was hexane:ethyl acetate (90:10). This, along with the spotted TLC plate, were added to a 150 ml beaker and covered with a watch glass. The solvent was allowed to move up the plate. The TLC was removed and examined with an iodine jar and a UV light. Each spot had its Rf value recorded. A 10 ml graduated cylinder was filled with hexane. Then, two microliters of the…

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    My First Chemistry Lab

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    proud of me after seeing me work with micropipettes and fancy machines like the NanoDrop 2000 software. So, we were assigned the drug Sulfanilamide. We took 0.25mM of the drug and calibrated/standardized in order to create a calibration curve. We separated the two solvents by using a liquid/liquid extraction. That means we mixed our drug with the two solvents and analyzed how much was in both. We then solved for the partition coefficient (Log P) to describe the degree to which the dug prefers…

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    Chemical Copy

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    Both IR and UV spectroscopy are methods of measuring the wavelengths absorbed by a tested material. IR spectroscopy measures the absorbance of the tested material in the infrared spectrum, the section of the electromagnetic spectrum with a lower frequency than that observed in the visible light spectrum. Conversely, UV spectroscopy measures the absorbance of the tested material in the ultraviolet spectrum, the section of the electromagnetic spectrum with a higher frequency than that observed in…

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    Brass Using Colorimetry

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    The ultimate purpose of this lab is to find how much copper is in brass using the visible spectroscopy, in addition to the introduction of Beer’s law, a physical law that can be utilized to determine the unknown concentration of a metal ion in a solution if its absorbance is calculated; you can accurately measure it by means of a standard graph called a calibration curve. Also colorimetry, a technique “used to determine the concentration of colored compounds in solution” (Housecroft, Catherine)…

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