Constitution of Australia

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    Anzac Day Analysis

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    etc.) already present in a society. For example, “Anzac Day is likely to evoke a different kind of Australianness from a multicultural festival or a visit to Uluru” (Carter 2006, p.12). This shows that there are multiple identities associated with Australia. Furthermore, national identities change according to each person. The transnational sharing of cultures, ideas, resources, and histories make ideas about national identity different for each person. For example, “Australians have long…

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    medical resources and education services. Then the Prime Minister says sorry and everyone thinks it is refined, and there is no public holiday for the memorable event. Well, that was what happened on the 13 February 2008 and it impacted 3.3% of Australia population or over 650,000…

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    With age come many challenges, especially for refugees. Combined with the pressure to assimilate to a new culture, the trials of old age put the mental health of refugees at serious risk. At time when more than 59 million people are displaced worldwideㅡthe highest on record according to UN reportsㅡless than half of those individuals have received refugee status. Based on data from the United Nations refugee agency, around 3 percent of the refugees coming to the U.S. are 60 years old or older.…

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    Australia: A Future Superpower The smallest continent halfway across the world from its political allies is setting its place in the world. Through its strong economy and military position Australia is an ever growing superpower. Australia 's diverse environment provides a wide variety of resources that protect them from foreign dependence. The 6th largest country in the world has an economic growth of 3% annually. Australia is a primary member of the leading military alliance on the planet…

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    Developed by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, the Australian Curriculum provides Australian students with a world-class education comprising of the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for life and work in the twenty-first-century. The primary goal of the Australian Curriculum is to foster students’ confidence and creativity, strengthening their love of learning and development into active and informed citizens (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and…

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    Every day in states across the Australia, homeless women, men and children walk the streets, often begging for money, carrying plastic bags or pushing shopping carts filled with what little personal possessions they own. It is hard to comprehend that in a country as affluent as Australia there is such a large amount of people in the community who do not have homes. But over the last couple of decade’s homelessness and poverty has become a serious issue in recent years due to the increase in…

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    as deeply supportive and in favour of the commitment to enter the conflict. The newspapers and the actions of many men and women as war broke out, displayed that a patriotic front was present among Australians. Carl Bridge is of the opinion that Australia was highly motivated and unanimously supportive towards the war. Other historians, such as Eric Andrews, however, are not convinced that there was unanimous support among the Australian people in response to the war, despite the positive front…

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    behaviours/practices and can be based on race, ethnicity, culture or religion” (Paradies et al., 2009, p. 7). And this definition of racism is mirrored in the history of Indigenous Australians in the more distant past as well as in contemporary Australia. To be specific, the colonial history shows a typical example of institutional racism, a discriminatory limitation against ethnic groups via laws, practices, and policies (Hampton & Toombs, 2013, p. 30). At the beginning of colonisation,…

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    alliances during World War 2 (1939-1945) saw Australia begin to shift its dependence from Britain to the United States of America (USA), due to threatening attacks from Japan, consequently impacting Australia’s participation in the war and the shaping of the nation’s policies and identity. As the Axis forces continued to advance with Japan at the forefront, threat toward Australia grew and the country questioned their connection with their ‘Mother Country’. Australia had to look elsewhere for…

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    Australian Pride

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    Pride Australia being a nation of wealth and prosperity, that dignifies itself on its “Aussie pride” rather than human rights is the main reason as to why we haven 't secured a seat at the United Nations human rights council (UNHRC). While Australia is commendable for some of its approaches to HR, they continue to face issues with their harsh mandatory detention and turn back policy as well as over representation of indigenous people in the criminal justice system. Additionally, Australia…

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