Constitution of India

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    John Locke's Social Contract Theory is particularly reflected in the Constitution of India. As indicated by Locke's hypothesis, man in the 'state of Nature' wanted to secure their property and with the end goal of protection of their property, men went into the "Social Contract". Under the agreement, individuals met up and made two unison - Pactum Unionis and Pactum Subjectionis. The Preamble to the Constitution of India begins with the phrase “WE, THE PEOPLE OF INDIA, having solemnly resolved to constitute India into a SOVEREIGN…” This shows the people of India coming together to form a sovereign authority i.e., the Sovereign of India. This can aptly be related to the Pactum Unionis as described in Locke’s theory. The Preamble ends with “……

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    Located on the continent of Asia, India is a place you might want to expand your knowledge on. For starters, the countries bordering India consist of Bangladesh, Nepal, China and Pakistan. To the south of India is the Indian Ocean. India covers 1,269,000 square miles making it about one-third the size of the United States. (MapFight) After World War I, a nationalist movement supporting civil disobedience was led by Mahatma Ghandi. Mahatma Ghandi fought injustice and defended his rights as an…

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    responsible for this act violence, suggesting that they were a deliberate act of Congress policy .Gandhi resolutely denied these charges, but the deadlock was not to be resolved. Quaid-e-Azam considered Quit India movement as anti-Muslims action of the Congress and declared it as political Black-Mailing .the Muslim League in reply to “ Quit India ” slogans by the Congress demanded “ First Divide and then Quit .” Quaid-e-Azam said, “The Quit India Movement in fact is a conspiracy to establish…

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    India gained Independence from the British colony like the United States, but at a much later date. In addition, India also has a constitution like the United States; however, the Indian constitution provides a parliamentary form of government. The legislative and executive branches are composed together in a Parliament called a Sansad. Furthermore, the Sansad consists of two houses that include the Council of States as the upper house and People’s Assembly as the lower house. The Congress…

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    Day of Deliverance. 5. The Lahore Resolution. 6. The Cripp’s Mission. 7. The Quit India Movement. 1. Enforcement of Government of India Act 1935:- Following the Simon Commission and Round Table Conference, the British Government passed the Government of India Act in 1935. This was the last major legislation by the British Government in respect of India prior to independence in 1947. The Act was divided into parts which would take effect in stages by 1947. • The main points of the Act were:- …

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    hope for the depressed and discriminated human beings in India. He was the greatest son born to India. A True “Bharat Ratna”, who liberated millions of people who were denied basic human rights, kept oppressed and who were generation to generation exploited in the name of caste-based hierarchy, religion and treated as outcaste. Ambedkar sowed for them the seeds of true freedom…

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    Mother India or Tyrant Indira Gandhi leaves a divided legacy. To the poor she is a hero. She is Mother India, who helped the underprivileged with her social welfare programs and the mother of the Green Revolution, which helped make India self-sufficient in grain productions. For others she is the architect of the Emergency, a dark period in India’s history when democracy was suppressed and political enemies we put down or jailed. Under her rule India won a war against Pakistan freeing the east,…

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    inapplicability in many democratising countries today. To address this tension, this essay will outline the theoretical foundations of modernisation theory and subsequently offer an institutionalist and voluntarist approach in revealing its inapplicability in India. To conclude, this essay will explore the implications of India’s democratic success on the present state of modernisation theory. I) MODERNISATION THEORY Modernisation theory is concisely summarised by Lipset’s famous adage “the…

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    Religious Diversity Paper

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    This paper is about my experience of religious diversity issue which I faced at the filtration process/entrance of my under graduate education. India is a country of various cultures and diversities in religion. Dating back to 1500 BC, There existed 4 categories of people namely Brahmins, Kshatriyas, vyshyas and shudras in the society (mentioned in the decreasing sequence of their social hierarchy). The shudras/untouchables were typically designated as labor class and performed menial jobs.…

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    Sambhava which is religious tolerance and equality (a substantial one) for all the religions; hence do we see special privileges offered to the minority communities. At the same time, one could argue that what we have in India is pseudo-secularism; the Shah Bano case for example. But also, although I cannot argue that India is not a secular state, I still cannot imagine a religion-powered state or vice-versa. If people think secularism is creating differences and thus communal violence, what is…

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