Non-Alignment Policy And Its Impact On India's Foreign Policy

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India gained Independence from the British colony like the United States, but at a much later date. In addition, India also has a constitution like the United States; however, the Indian constitution provides a parliamentary form of government. The legislative and executive branches are composed together in a Parliament called a Sansad. Furthermore, the Sansad consists of two houses that include the Council of States as the upper house and People’s Assembly as the lower house. The Congress Party, Bharatiya Janata Party , and the United Front that makes up the main political parties found in India. India’s foreign policy was conducted under the influence Jawaharlal Nehru and he was the first prime minister of the independent India. The outline of the policy was mostly impacted by international development after World War II. During this time period, the goal was to push democracy forward and weakened the idea of imperialism. A key policy in India was the Non- Alignment Policy which was an independent policy that helped control the strength of India. As a result, the policy was subjected to remove India in any different controversy that may lead to conflict or even a war. The main goal of the Non-Alignment policy was to uphold World Peace. The policy key principles included: equality …show more content…
The Bharatiya Janata Party brought forward a new prime minister named Narenda Modi, who stated that one of the key goals of his regime was to make India a more productive place. The BJP reputation highlighted the little to no regard of the minority groups as well as religion that did not compensate the Indian constitution. India wanted a new form of government from the Nehru family. India wanted a new and fresh way of doing thing, so by electing the BJP they believed they were going to be capable of doing just

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