Gandhi's Responsible For The Quit India Movement

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responsible for this act violence, suggesting that they were a deliberate act of Congress policy .Gandhi resolutely denied these charges, but the deadlock was not to be resolved.
Quaid-e-Azam considered Quit India movement as anti-Muslims action of the Congress and declared it as political Black-Mailing .the Muslim League in reply to “ Quit India ” slogans by the Congress demanded “ First Divide and then Quit .” Quaid-e-Azam said, “The Quit India Movement in fact is a conspiracy to establish Hindu Raj and to finish Muslims demands.”
The British swiftly responded by mass detentions. The prominent leaders of this movement including Gandhi were arrested and put in jails. A total of 90,000 arrests were made nationwide.
Cabinet Mission (1946):
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They realized that they had to transfer power to India. The question was, to whom should power be transferred? Left to its self
Simla Conference 1945:
In 1943, the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill replaced Lord Linlithgow and appointed the Commander-in Chief, Lord Wavell in his place. Churchill had expected that, being a military man, Lord Wavel would take no political initiative but the new viceroy, a conscientious man, made an attempt to break the political deadlock in the country by installing an interim government representative of Indian political parties. In his scheme, the viceroy and the commander in chief would continue to be British while all the members of the Viceroy‘s Executive Council would be Indian.
Unlike at the time of the Cripps after, the Congress did not raise any objective to the conduct of war being directed by the British .the viceroy made it clear that this arrangement would last as long as the war with the Japanese continued. The interim government would function under the existing constitution, i.e. GOI Act
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The Conservative Party led by Winston Churchill (1874-1965) still nurtured hopes of an empire and great power status; but was defeated in the 1945 elections.
The Labour Government under the new Prime Minister, Clement Atlee, Was more conscious of the economic plight of Britain, and also more sympathetic to the cause of Indian Independence. They realized that they had to transfer power to India. The question was, to whom should power be transferred? Left to itself, the Labour party would have transferred power to the Indian National Congress as the overall majority Party, but the Conservative part especially its leader, were aware of the pledges the British had given to the minorities and the chamber of Princes. Recognizing that Muslims numbered ninety million, Churchill held the opinion that the word minorities had no relevance or sense when applied to masses of human beings numbered in many scores of millions. He was later to publicly this state in parliament. The Conservative Party was then in opposition, but in the strong two parties system the opposition was powerful, and in the House of Lords the Conservative Part had greater

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