Psychiatric hospital

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    than the national rankings. Binge drinking continues escalating with women of childbearing age at its highest. However, over the years there has been a decline in the number of underage drinking (Wisconsin Department of Health Services, 2014). Hospitals in the county have been working towards common goals to help reduce unhealthy alcohol use in the community. Misuse of alcohol has many repercussions including violence, injury, death, fetal harm and miscarriage. Risk factors include culture,…

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    Our prisons are expanding each year rather than the mental health hospital that would treat mentally ill people. Lack of proper care and treatment, lack of social support pushes mentally ill into the prison system. Other than the shortage of psychiatric beds, mentally ill individuals enter the criminal justice system due to lack of interaction between them and law enforcement persons. When mentally ill is not…

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    Jfk Mental Health Case

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    Facilities and Community Mental Health Centers Construction Act of 1963 (CMHCA). The law was intended to deinstitutionalize patients from mental health hospitals and demonstrate a compromise between public health and medical practice models (Cameron, 1989). The law offered States financial incentives to build community-based outpatient centers to replace hospitals (Cameron, 1989). Due to the complexity of public health and treatment, the law has been revised numerous times since its…

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    thousands of severely mentally ill patients living in psychiatric hospitals were released, mostly to the streets, which is known as deinstitutionalization.…

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    were unable to treat the huge volume of individuals released from hospitals (Lamb, Weinberger, & Gross, 2004). Other community resources did not offer the right treatment for individuals with dual diagnosis. After being released in the community, many individuals had trouble obtaining treatment (Lamb, Weinberger, & Gross, 2004). Others had an absence of any community support such as family members when they were released from hospitals (Lamb, Weinberger, & Gross, 2004). These individuals…

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    On average, twenty percent of inmates in jails and fifteen percent of inmates in prisons have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness (Z. K. Torrey). In comparison, there are ten times less mentally ill individuals residing in psychiatric institutions than there are in prisons. The fact that the correctional system has become the primary treatment for the mentally ill should be deeply concerning to not only those affected by mental illness, but all of…

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    Personal Social Identity

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    influences behind psychiatric disorders, my major and research experience demonstrates my interests in developmental genetics and psychiatry. In addition, my experience working with a wide variety of patients from my exposure in the ED at the Mount Sinai Hospital and my interactions with inpatients at the 18N psychiatric unit and outpatients in Bellevue Hospital, demonstrates my clinical experience with patients. In addition, I have shadowed both ED doctors at the Mount Sinai hospital and have…

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    Locking In Jails

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    health diseases is to keep them in jail where help is available. Criminals with a history of mental health problems should be kept in jail for the safety of the community. In an article written by Sarah Glazer, she denotes that “some experts say psychiatric treatment alone won 't prevent criminal behavior,” (241) meaning that other means of helping felons with mental illness are necessary. If a mentally ill person with previous criminal history is permanently locked away, then no…

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    explanations of mental illness. The history of mental illness prior to the Victorian era will be considered in order to learn the challenges psychiatry had to overcome. The Victorian changes will also be considered and the development of modern psychiatric care will be explored in order to discover the challenges psychiatry…

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    depression or anxiety) in primary care settings is more effective approach compared to the prevailing mode of delivering treatment through specialist facilities in psychiatric hospitals. It is suggested that an integrated care model, in which primary care physicians working in joint collaboration with psychiatrists and trained hospital staff, can lead to better patient…

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