Psychiatric hospital

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    Noelle Albert 1 May 2015 AP Lang- P5 Mrs. Rose Deinstitutionalization Draft That man with a cardboard sign standing on the median; the one who clings to his bike, coasting down Main Street with dozens of plastic bags hung precariously from its handlebars; those huddled under garbage bags on park benches to keep warm in the frigid winter air; families who drag themselves to soup kitchens as a last resort to avoid starvation. Common sights like these bring about curiosity and pity and blame. That…

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    Stigma About Mental Health

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    The Origins of Stigma about Mental Health The word stigma emanates from the Greek language meaning a mark that is left in the body during the cultural branding of animals in the Greek culture. The name would gain popularity in later years only this time referring to the unwarranted social disapproval of a due to perceived or existing individual characteristics. In most instances, the stigma is based on backward and stereotypic beliefs that have a very shallow premise (Stuart, 2008). The…

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    Then and Now: Psychiatric Hospitals A psychiatric hospital is a hospital or ward that specializes in treating many different mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and many other serious disorders. Mental illness is often stigmatized in societies across the world. Treatments are changing everyday as medications and therapy become more readily available. The condition of mental hospitals and wards are changing drastically. Psychiatric hospitals of the 1950’s…

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    The treatment of mental patients has greatly improved since the 1960s, but it still is not perfect. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a novel written by Ken Kesey and published in 1962. Chief Bromden, a schizophrenic patient in an insane asylum who pretends to be dumb and deaf to avoid confrontation, narrates what happens in the ward. When authority hating Randle McMurphy is committed to the ward, he notices the head nurse, Nurse Ratched, manipulates her patients to keep her authority, rather…

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    medical professionals on the accuracy of their diagnoses, pertaining to psychiatric disorders. Him and eight other friends faked their way into asylums set around the United States to see what would happen if they started displaying “sane” behavior once inside. This experiment caused much aggravation among psychiatric experts who felt that Rosenhan was trying to make a mockery of the science. It also helped improve the psychiatric evaluation process by creating more detailed criteria that must…

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    officials. Because of this and frequent complaints made by her superiors, in 1863 all nurses were now to report to the highest ranking hospital official in accordance with the General Orders No. 351- bypassing Dorothea completely. After the war Dorothea resumed her work in the advocacy for the treatment of the mentally ill, finding that in the years after the war hospitals that had once been expanded for the care of the mentally ill were now overcrowded and the plight for those were now just as…

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    hundred mental health centers that were funded with federal money. The legislation’s original design was a $7 billion dollar effort with the goal of creating two thousand communities mental health centers across the country. The elimination of mental hospitals led to an expectation of states to take over the few that existed, even though a significant lack of funding was evident. As a result, many states commenced the campaign of deinstitutionalization to replace community-based practices for…

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    Prior to 19th century, mental illness was viewed as a criminal act rather than an involuntary affliction, until one woman’s persistence changed the world’s perception of mental health. Dorothea Dix was an author, teacher, and reformer renowned for her strides in the improvement of treatment for the mentally insane. In her early years, she indulged her passion for learning through a career in teaching and encouraged women to pursue an education. In her later years, the hints of rebellious…

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    Anne Dix Biography

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    Dix’s interest in mental health reform didn’t materialize out of the ether. It had roots in her personality, as well as experiences she had while in England. Dix’s personality had the desire to make some sort of mission out of her life, hungering to find a cause to devote herself to. Without any solid purpose in her life, she floated, untethered. In 1838, in response to a letter that Dix had sent her, Dix’s friend Anne noted that Dix was a “…wanderer, doomed to know many a thing of grief and…

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    On the other hand, approximately one third of that population make up the homelessness are mentally ill to be specific that is 250,000 people and this number is growing even to this day. These mentally ill people have an option to go to a mental hospital to receive help but they choose not to why is this? A recent topic in our society has risen about should mentally ill homeless people be forced into mental institutions even if they aren’t in favor of being treated.…

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