Psychiatric hospital

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    Until the nineteenth century, mental illnesses was mostly treated in domestic settings. With the establishment of “mad houses”, the settings of care altered to medical institutions, but therapies and treatments remained largely unsuccessful in curing cognitive impairment. The development of psychosurgery offered a solution to the lack of therapeutic interventions for the mentally ill, although looking back on the treatment, many faults can be noticed. However, using a historical lens, the use…

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    The Returned Analysis

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    manner of thinking. In fact, the United States still has failed to provide the services that mentally ill people need and the Medicare law is injustice against those with a mental illness(Szabo). There has not been treatment provided in community, hospitals, crowded state and local jails which has left many untreated mentally ill patients on the streets(Szabo). There is a strong relationship between stigma and normality because normality in society is what’s desirable in terms of being liked and…

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    mentally ill are forced to pay for their medications: which most are unable to do. However, overall the treatment plans for mentally ill in most jails are largely unhelpful. Although medications help repress their illness, solitary confinement worsens psychiatric symptoms and can lead to “self-mutilation and suicide attempts” (Stephy 2). Due to the instability of a severely mentally ill person’s mind, they do not learn the punishment behind solitary confinement like sane minded people. Jail does…

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    (Tracy, 2015). We need to find a way to bring doctors to those who need the help. If that means more funding needs to be allocated to the front-line, our police officers, who are the first on scene and can help direct persons with mental illness to psychiatric help, then it should be given. Ultimately the biggest problem is the unwillingness from society and medical professionals to recognize…

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    Wrong Thoughts: The Tragedy of Mental Illness The mind bears many titles. It is the brain, the thought provoker, the roadmap, and exclusively the source of all wit and intellect. Just as the famous saying goes: “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.” Having agency and personality are some of the most distinguishing attributes that characterizes a human being. Despite this fact, the maxim aforementioned as well identifies a well-rooted calamity that is not only plaguing the U.S. but the entire…

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    The Frontline video documentary, “The Released,” is a follow-up film of Frontline’s “The New Asylum” which is a documentary about how correctional facilities became a dumping ground for our society’s mentally ill criminals after state psychiatric hospitals closed down in the 1970’s. The movie, “The Released” however, focuses on what happens to people with chronic mental health issues after being released from prisons and jails. The film shows us that most of these mentally ill inmates end up…

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    Having an altered perception of the world, Ken Kesey created the captivating novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. In his novel Kesey has constructed a world within a psychiatric ward, which becomes a microcosm of society. In this world the assumed deaf and dumb Chief Bromden, and other timid patients are heavily controlled by Nurse Ratched, an authority apart of the powerful and dehumanising combine. Through figurative language, foreshadowing and motifs readers are warned about the influence…

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    Issues regarding Mental Institutions and Asylums People who are mentally ill are stigmatized as being dangerous, unpredictable and crazy. However, this is only a misconception. Once the mentally ill receive proper care and treatment for their illnesses, the road to recovery is not as difficult as it seems. Sylvia Plath, the award winning author of The Bell Jar, has been personally affected by mental illness, specifically suicidal depression. This illness has sadly caused Plath to take her own…

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    Rose spent the next 10 years in and out of mental hospitals switching from time to time due to her therapist. The worst family therapist Rose has ever received was Mr. Walker. As he would read Rose’s file in front of the family, Rose would oddly and slowly start massaging her breasts. This gave Mr. Walker…

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    Schizophrenia Case Study

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    Introduction and context Luke is a 19 year old man who was brought in to the Department of Emergency Medicine (DEM) in protective custody under an assessment order and an interment treatment order to an acute mental health facility with a diagnosis of drug induced psychosis and querying schizophrenia. Luke comes from a low socioeconomic background and is currently receiving youth allowance payments. Luke is a smoker with a history of illicit drug use and alcohol abuse. Luke has recently moved…

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