Psychiatric hospital

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    The first public British psychiatric asylums began to surface in the early 17th century and their questionable treatment of patients continues to be the spark of controversy. In the beginning, large Victorian public asylums were advertised with curative treatments and benevolent therapies with a emphasis on humanity (Hand). With this assurance that Victorian people’s mentally ill family, friends, and peers would be receiving sufficient care, these institutions gained a considerable amount of…

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    taking his life. At this point he realizes his worth and checks himself into a psychiatric hospital for an attempt to become normal once again. Through the character of Craig, It’s Kind of a Funny Story suggests that: when an individual is surrounded by concepts and figures that create stress and pressure, initially he or she will attempt to avoid the feared concepts…

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    The early years of psychiatric field have provided the media with material for horror stories for ages now. Starting with colonial America, where people chained their ‘disturbed’ relatives and neighbors to the metal poles or locked them in small rooms for their entire lives, and ending with asylums, where doctors and nurses indulged in cruel behavior toward the patients, experimenting with inhumane methods of subduing the insane with lobotomy and electroconvulsive therapy. But is this picture…

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    Mentally Ill Stereotypes

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    These mental hospitals were specifically reserved for individuals that had severe mental illnesses that at the time included “schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, and major depression” (Torrey, Kennard, Eslinger, Lamb Pavle,2010). Due to Dorothea 's efforts, a survey done in 1880 in the United States indicated that “40,942 insane persons were in hospitals and asylums for the insane while finding only 397 insane persons in…

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    into a hospital. With this, there is a decent chance that a person may find an alternative treatment suited to their liking and needs. Also, countries such as the United States who saw a dramatic decline in the number of patients who were confined to mental institutions from 1955 to 2010 may have had the opportunity to use the money saved or not used to run the institutions on something considered to be more important at the time. In 1955 there was a peak of 560,000 mentally ill in psychiatric…

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    Dorothea Dix Philosophy

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    Originally named Dorothea Lynde Dix, she was born in Hampden, Maine during the year 1802. While growing up, however, Dix did not experience a normal childhood, instead she grew up in an unhappy home with neglectful parents. As a result, she suffered from depression at several times and by age thirty three, Dix had a complete physical and psychological breakdown. In order to restore her health, Dix embarked on a trip to Europe in 1836 where she resided in the home of William Rathbone and his…

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    However, today it has become a major issue in American prisons with more and more institutions facing the challenge of mental health head-on rather than sweeping this long-time problem under the rug. Correctional institutions have tried to introduce psychiatric programs with the hope of treating mentally ill offenders and lowering recidivism rates. Prisons now include mental health professionals, who work closely with prison staff with the intent of improving inmate health and behavior, but it…

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    Levin, A. (2011). Media cling to Stigmatizing portrayals of mental illness. Psychiatric News, 46(24), 16a–16a. doi:10.1176/pn.46.24.psychnews_46_24_16-a Explanation of article: This article takes a look at how people diagnosed with a mental illness is portrayed in the media in regards to violent offences. The article shows how media outlets frame their stories. Levin talks about how, “People with mental disorders are more likely to be victims of crimes than perpetrators, but this is not how the…

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    powers was safeguarded by an added clause in the act that prohibited the use of funds on providing state hospitals equipment or personnel training (Torrey, 2014, p. 26). Through this strategy, states would still have a large degree of autonomy when it came to managing the hospitals. Since Felix was pushing for community mental health clinics rather than the preservation and reformation of state hospitals, it was not a hard point to sell to him. The passing of the act allowed for the…

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    and you seem to be doing the best that you can. However, it has come to my attention that one of your nurses, Nurse Ratched, has been treating not only the patients poorly, but your employees poorly as well. As a monitor of local Mental Health Hospitals, it is my top priority to ensure the safety and wellbeing of those staying in each institution. The Nurse refers to these specific workers as “The Black Boys”, and I feel as if this is an injustice to them and the work they are called to perform…

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