Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

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    The last section of chapter discusses Edinburgh and Lausanne’s’ relationship to convergence. Chapter five focuses on the convergence beyond the Lausanne movement. The chapter starts of discussing the theological convergence’s impact “on the broader evangelical and ecumenical world focusing on theological assumptions (162)” and “missiological methods that emerged from the Lausanne movement” (Pruitt 167). Pruitt discusses the International Mission Board (IMB) and its relationship with Lausanne, as well as DAWN ministries, Youth with A Mission, The Alliance for Saturation Church Planting. He ends chapter five and the book with “closing thoughts on theological convergence” (Pruitt 191) and a final note that “theological convergence is not a one-way street. Convergence has taken place among evangelicals and ecumenical alike” (Pruitt 197). At the end of the book there are addendums. The first is the actual Lausanne Covenant. Following the covenant is Billy Graham archives, Transcripts of Stan Nussbaum, Michael O’Rear, David Hesselgrave, and Keith Eitel. These are followed by the Manila Manifesto, oral Interviews and Keith Eitel questionnaire. Personal Reaction, Application &…

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    regulation and chaos. From my limited exposure my consulting client, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Milwaukee (ELCA), is suffering from some of the chaos of not enough oversight and systematic guidelines. Edward Schein, an organizational development expert who taught at MIT, defined an organization’s culture as its “artifacts, espoused beliefs and values, and basic underlying assumptions.” Aubrey Malphurs adapted this definition for the purpose of understanding church culture and said that…

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    With the lack of any official dogma or creed, Unitarian Universalists were encouraged to find out what the truth was to them, and as long as it did not disrespect anyone else, they were not turned away (Larson). This allows for a wide spectrum of beliefs in the church. However, many of the believers’ views tend to be more liberal (Religion Facts). For example, there are many beliefs about God including theism, atheism, or agnosticism. Most tend to not believe in God, but as a whole they believe…

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    For example, Unitarian Universalism originated from the unification of two different religions in 1961 while Buddhism was founded by a single person named Siddhartha Gautama in the year 525 B.C.E. (“Unitarian Universalist”;“Buddhism” 2016). Additionally the basis for Unitarian Universalism in America stems from the establishment of the first Unitarian church located in Philadelphia, founded by Joseph Priestly in 1796 and the first Universalist church founded by John Murray in Massachusetts in…

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    Sexes” was incorporated into “The Feminist Papers”by Alice Rossi to restore Murray’s role in women’s history. Many women scholars followed Rossi and publish Murray’s ideas of equality for women. For example, The Gleaner was republished in 1992 by the Union College Press as well many of Murray’s early essays, poetry, and autobiography. Murray struggles to spread the idea of women’s rights made her “internalization of the post-Revolutionary backlash particularly poignant and the coming of…

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    obvious that He was the one who was building me back up. Little did I know that God can use anybody and everybody for his glory, no matter what their story is like. I grew up on a dairy farm outside of Chambers, Nebraska. Partially because I held the stigma of the over-achieving oldest child and partially because I attended an extremely small public school, I felt a personal pressure to excel in as many extra-curricular activities as possible. A traditionally rural and conservative atmosphere…

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    Reformation. This movement’s aim is to correct the errors and abuses of the Roman Catholic Church (Jacobs 404). One of the movement’s most prominent leaders, Martin Luther, makes this aim his life goal. This man’s life, character, and teachings create the basis for the Lutheran church. Martin Luther was born into late fifteenth century Germany. He was born to unspectacular parents, and his upbringing was fairly harsh (Durant 341). As the sixteenth century dawned, young Luther began studying…

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    The important forces that motivated for missionary movement were: first, Captain Cook’s Voyages that appeared in 1770s gave a picture of sea route map of the world; and second, William Carey’s An Inquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens, published in 1792. As a result, in 1792, ‘Particular Baptist Society for the Propagation of the Gospel amongst the Heathen” was founded and in 1793 William Carey and John Thomas sailed to India. Following…

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    Lutheranism And Religion

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    The church is the group wherein God’s salvation from sin is found. It is the group that Jesus purchased with His own blood (Acts 20:28). Jesus is the head and director of this group, and He dictates what it may or may not do (Col. 1:18). Every immersed believer is admitted to this group, and once he or she becomes part of it, he or she remains there until he or she chooses otherwise. To Lutherans, the church is the assembly of all believers where the gospel is preached and the sacraments…

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    the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America states that “abortion prior to viability [of a fetus] should not be prohibited by law or by lack of public funding” but that abortion after the point of fetal viability should be prohibited except when the life of a mother is threatened or when fetal abnormalities pose a fatal threat to a newborn (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 1991). In contrast, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, states that "human life must be respected and protected…

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