Episodic memory

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    Tulving’s persuasive theory of the two propositional memory types: Episodic and Semantic, have been pivotal in the research and study of Long-Term Memory for over four decades (Brown, Creswell, & Ryan, 2016). Semantic memory provides us with the memory needed for the use of language, whereas episodic memory focuses on the autobiographical events that can be explicitly recalled. There are many differences in these two memory sub-types that further differentiate them from one another. In addition…

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    Episodic memory is the process of recalling personally experienced past events. The efficiency of this process is adversely affected by age. In a sense, this may explain the level of emotional distress that the aged and their kin and all others feel at the onset of failing episodic memory Riding a bike, thinking of the trip you took when you were 10, and where to put the ice cream all have something in common(Dritschel & others, 2011; Wang, 2009).They are all are part of memory. Even though they…

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    increase its ability to process information in later situations. Emotions are also linked to memory, so when a song makes you really happy or sad you’re more likely to remember it; when alzheimer's patients hear a familiar song, it’s not unheard of them singing along with it, and there are some days that patients can only remember a song from their youth. Even with older adults without alzheimer's, memory is being helped from upbeat and downbeat music. Listening to music can enhance mood,…

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    Henry M.: Episodic Memory

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    This will cause previously consolidated memories to become lost and unable to be retrieved. Retrograde memories are the events that patient H.M. could remember before the surgery had taken place. H.M. lost his ability to convert new experiences into explicit memories, but he was able to retain a lot of his procedural or implicit memories. An explicit memory is a memory that people are aware of and it can be verbally described. This means that it is declarative…

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    lecture, “Memory and Imagination: Functions of Episodic Simulation and Retrieval.” Due to my lack of experience and knowledge of the subject, I wasn’t able to comprehend the majority of it. The lecture began with Dr. Schacter introducing and describing episodic memory. Episodic memory is the storage unit for personal memories of events or experiences from the past. Dr. Schacter studied amnesic patients who exhibit an impairment in remembering personal experiences, so their episodic memory…

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    On the surface, memory appears to be passive experience; it is strange and often intangible. However, dive deeper it reveals that memory can leave strong impressions on individuals. Memories are moments a person lived and remembers when recounted. Memories can come in many forms. According to Jan Assmann, communicative memory is a shared and transferable within a social group defined by common memories of personal interaction. The communicative memory comprises memories related to the recent…

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    the hippocampus results in better episodic memory? It’s a wonder why some people have great memory of past events, while others have none. As an adult it gets increasingly harder to remember events you experienced as a child. It has always been a phenomenon as to why you can’t remember the memories you had as a child. Why you forget what happens before the age of four. As an infant your brain is busy making new cells in the hippocampus, so they don’t store memories that would otherwise be…

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    Gender Differences in Memory for Object and Word Location Why are men better at map reading than women? And why are women better at recalling routes and recognizing objects location? According to Postma and Maartje (2007), they define object location as the cognitive ability that allows individuals to recall specific objects, and functions in everyday life. Object location aides us remembering where we left certain items such as water bottle, cellphone, or keys and in explaining our environment…

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    inaccuracies about memory. This paper will analyze the cause, symptoms and treatment of Lucy’s amnesia and compare her experience to what is known about amnesia from neuropsychology. One year after the car accident that caused Lucy’s memory problems, a man named Henry introduces himself to Lucy in the Hukilau Café and…

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    interests are focused on molecular mechanisms of memory formation during infancy. I’m very interested in exploring how experiences during infancy results in hippocampal long-lasting changes, which influence adult behavior. Traumatic early life experiences can predispose individuals to psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), borderline personality disorder, addiction, depression and anxiety1-4. Paradoxically, episodic memories formed during infancy are apparently…

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