Epistemic virtue

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    Rich or poor, male or female, everyone was only concerned with his or her own desires during the Progressive Era, and although this may be considered a negative attribute, it was not in all cases A rich, powerful man in this time period was exceptionally egocentric; however, it is an easy misconception that only these men that this trait. Egocentrism was not only for the rich because the poor’s mentality was self-centered as well. Their social status may have been different, but they thought the same. The rich and poor alike shared the notion that the world revolved around them and everything should fit to their needs. The social egocentrism broke up into three categories: the domineering, deserve-all attitude of the upper class, the want and need to get something done for the poor, and, finally, the attitude of being better than the rest. The successful, upper-class men became who they were because of egocentrism, and they rarely thought about how it would affect other people. As much domination as possible was the goal. There is no real answer to asking why these men pushed for power. The mindset of being the best brought great success. A feeling of self-superiority was the initiative to bring them to the top. The ladder to success may have used other humans as the rungs, but not a care was given. The men were ready to step on as many people as needed to get to where they believed they belonged. Everything done was for their own self while completely disregarding others.…

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    My goal in this paper is to analyze compassion, selfishness, and gullibility in an epistemic context. Specifically, how one’s level of compassion influence how they weigh evidence and knowledge – and how being compassionate, at least intellectually, can be considered an important epistemic virtue. Compassion, outside of an epistemic context, is generally viewed as a desirable character trait. I say generally, because no two individuals have exactly the same sense of what the word compassion…

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    A Comparison of Medina and Nietzsche’s Philosophy The philosophies of Jose Medina and Friedrich Nietzsche differ in the sense that Medina focuses on the epistemic injustice while Nietzsche focuses on deconstructing morality. Medina explores injustice in society with the goal of finding factors that contribute to its existence. In essence, the philosopher believes morality to be a noble human virtue, and a factor that can be used to eliminate social injustices. However, due to social beliefs that…

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    VI. The Wider Picture Institutional Inaction, Bullshit, and Lying do not exist in a vacuum. Frustratingly, their effects are have ramifications for our understanding of truth far outside of the immediate 'truth value of X'. Indeed, when we make epistemic missteps, it can affect our entire worldview, degrade the assurances we have of knowledge, and provoke disaster far down the line. William Clifford showed us the danger of a boat captain ignoring good epistemic virtues, but what of an entire…

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    ourselves with knowledge is crucial to everyone and therefore, must be properly understood by all. The puzzle of self-knowledge could be solved by disciplining our motivations and maxims to choose actions that uphold duty which are in accordance with virtue. Owen Ware begins his exposition of Kant’s the duty of self-knowledge by citing Kant’s writings that make the claim that we are unable to know our dispositions. In actual fact it is absolutely impossible for experience to establish with…

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    If we accept that most intellectual virtues have truth as their ultimate end; then it follows that our disposition in arriving at true knowledge is truth-driven. Zagzebski defines knowledge as, “cognitive contact with reality arising out of acts of intellectual virtue.” Arriving to moral and intellectual virtues is based on circumstance and motivation. Virtues are properties that add to the characteristics of a person. Virtuous motivation that results with an act can result from epistemic…

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    Mercy College defines integrity as, “Moral wholeness, soundness, uprightness, honesty and sincerity as the basis of trustworthiness.” I personally feel that integrity encompasses not only all of these characteristics, but also the ability to apply these characteristics in one’s everyday life. Someone who displays true integrity does not act honestly and sincerely just in easy situations, but also in the most difficult. Integrity is a value everyone should strive to perfect both professionally…

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    I’ve had many different friends in my life. I’ve had good and bad relationships. Friends that I grew apart from and others that ditched me because they simply just didn’t want to be my friend anymore. But all of those relationships, good and bad, have shaped who I am today and each have taught or showed me something different about friendship. For that reason all of the hurt, trials, and stress those relationships brought to my life was all worth it. It’s so important to surround you with people…

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    “There is no passion to be found playing small - in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living,” as stated by Nelson Mandela meaning that nothing should stop anyone from being living a good life and ultimately the life they want to live. To start living the best life possible is to be generous in everything from one’s time to money, to just simple words of encouragement. Similarly, it is important to always appreciate everything and to never take what one has for…

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    “Live life to the fullest” is my motto of living. According to me, life has two sides: one good and one bad. Although there are highs and low in my life, I like taking on the challenges by learning from my mistakes. Many people think that higher education is important element for a fulfilling life because with education, a person has the ability to demonstrate his/ her work to people. I think that along with education, there are many more elements that help a person to be successful. There are…

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