Creighton Abrams

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    A Better War examines how General Creighton Abrams’ switch from a policy of attrition to a policy of population security won the battles of Vietnam, but the incompetency of many in Congress lost the war. After General William C. Westmoreland failed to make progress in Vietnam, Abrams was promoted to replace Westmoreland. Under Abrams’ leadership, America saw many victories in Vietnam. However, all of the progress made came a little too late. Weak leadership from Westmoreland combined with a growing domestic opposition to the war forced the war to come to a close. The situation of the Vietnam War when General Abrams took command looked grim. The U.S. military was attempting to pursue a policy of attrition, with the goal being to inflict as many casualties on the enemy as possible rather than trying to secure territory. Abrams’ predecessor, General Westmoreland, had not made much progress in Vietnam with this policy. In fact, Westmoreland and his troops had suffered considerable losses. These losses caused public support for the war to be…

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    Creighton Vs Abrams

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    Creighton Williams Abrams Jr. was an outstanding tank commander in the U.S. Army during WWII, and who would later command military operations in the Vietnam War from 1968-72. Appointed Chief of Staff, Abrams would succeed General Westmoreland as the top commander of all U.S. forces in the Vietnam theatre in 1972. And begin to implement the transition to an all-volunteer force. Creighton W. Abrams was born on September 15th , 1914, in Springfield, Massachusetts. He graduated from the United…

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    General Creighton Abrams

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    Generals who left a lasting impact once their service was complete. One exceptional individual was General Creighton Abrams. His long stint in the US Army stretched to include positions served during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. During his time, he served as a Battalion Commander on various Corps level staffs, as Vice Chief of Staff, and as Chief of Staff during the later end of the Vietnam War. Although he introduced a multitude of doctrinal changes as the Chief of Staff,…

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    Lewis has more of a sympathetic view on how Nixon and his administration handled these events, even saying how Nixon was “quite successful” and blaming the defeat on budgetary pressures and political pressures. What we needed in the office was consistency and we weren’t getting that from the U.S. commanders. We had a replacement come in during the year of 1968. As if this is any excuse as to why Nixon lost the war, Sorely suggest that the advisors lacked this major key of consistency that they…

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    concrete, emotional and physical, that the average foot soldier had to carry through the jungles of Vietnam. All of the “things” are depicted in a style that is almost scientific in its precision. In the article and book, we are told how much each subject weighs, either psychologically or physically. The last review I have is by David Abrams. He states that the closest he has gotten to combat action that year was in the pages of Tim O’Brien (and Ernest Hemingway, Joseph Heller, and Erich Maria…

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    too much recoil and weighed too much for an efficient submachine gun. The MP5 improved upon this by making a small caliber machine gun that is compact, light, and reliable. Guns would be changed slightly to accommodate more modern attachments, but most guns would stem of similar designs to HK's. Gunships or attack helicopters would be changed as well with the addition of the AH-64 or the Apache in 1984.9 The Cobra was a smaller more nimble gunships but lacked the power to carry large munitions…

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    ¨strolling down the street.¨ As I suspected, the raiders were unintelligent enough to believe him, they’re nothing but pieces of stone. I managed to finish the wall and place 37mm cannons on it right before I heard the rumble of tanks. At first I thought it was one of our armored divisions sent by H.Q. to help with the raider threat; but, the sounds did not sound like the engines we used. The noised were of a struggling, salvaged engine trying to last out its life as long as possible. It was an…

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    Response To Conflict

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    not be dealt with properly. the conflict may have never been solved, causing a barrier between whoever was involved in the conflict. Understanding conflict leads to resolving disputes more effectively rather than misunderstanding the conflict and not understanding the other person’s ideas and goals (Creighton University). As a result if conflict is mismanaged, it can cause great harm to a relationship--possibly even causing the relationship to end-- rather than allowing the relationship to…

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    Strange Fruit

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    “Black bodies swingin’ in the Southern breeze / Strange fruit hangin’ from the poplar trees” (3-4). The poem “Strange Fruit” by Abel Meeropol was published in 1937. It sets a deep tone on how racism occurred back in the 1930s. Meeropol was an ordinary high school teacher who went on to teach English for seventeen years. He was also a poet and social activist. Meeropol was troubled at the racism going on in America. He was inspired to write this poem after seeing a photograph of two teenagers;…

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    Vietnam War was very controversial war among American’s. In the book “A Better War, The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam”. Westmoreland was more concerned with a “kill count” versus a more focused view of the bigger picture. Whereas, Abrams was a “one war” concept type of General. The situation at home when General Creighton Abrams took command in late 1968 as the COMUSMACV Commander. The civil unrest was getting progressively worse as evidenced by the…

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