General Creighton Abrams's Approach To The Vietnam War

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A Better War The Vietnam War was very controversial war among American’s. In the book “A Better War, The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam”. Westmoreland was more concerned with a “kill count” versus a more focused view of the bigger picture. Whereas, Abrams was a “one war” concept type of General. The situation at home when General Creighton Abrams took command in late 1968 as the COMUSMACV Commander. The civil unrest was getting progressively worse as evidenced by the assassinations of both Martin Luther King Jr and Senator Robert Kennedy. The Vietnam War did not help the cause any because the news stations were reporting that the war efforts were a great success knowing that the United States of …show more content…
Under Westmoreland things were more confused and strung out with nothing really being accomplished with him focusing on the kill count rather than the full extent of the war. Abrams focused on protecting the population of South Vietnam and preempting and logistically interrupting the NVA in order to prevent them from initiating attacks. Abrams approach to the Vietnam War was a great success because he had more common understanding about war and the conflicts that arise. Therefore, Abrams could make for focused and decisive decisions when …show more content…
The propaganda resulted in the cessation of bombing in Northern Vietnam and the NVA used that Anti-War movement to their advantage by attempting to gain better terms with regards to surrender and withdrawal. The Battle of Hamburger Hill was an intercept mission by both the ARVN and U.S. troops when the enemy moved in to take a strategic hill named Ap Bia Mountain also known as Hamburger Hill. This was a huge disruption of the enemy system, which prevented the layout of future operations in the populated areas. Senator Edward Kennedy stated that the war was “madness” and denounced it as “both senseless and irresponsible (A Better War).” Cambodia Operation was a seizure of the enemies supplies and areas. It was a huge stronghold of the Sihanoukville port that was point entry for military goods. This was a huge military success because the U.S. forces were able to inadvertently convince the four million members of the People’s Self-Defense Force to constitute a commitment to the government in opposition of the enemy. The Anti-War Movement view was skewed because the North Vietnamese had control over the doctrine that kept the views of war on one side not both. Regardless of the movement the war still went forward and was made difficult because of the

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