Applied linguistics

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    Contrastive Rhetoric Paper

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    Kaplan’s Traditional Contrastive Rhetoric Before 1960s, influenced strongly by structural linguistic and behavioral psychology, the teaching of English as a second/foreign language was mainly focused on spoken English, mostly “through pattern drills of the sentence structure and the sound system”. Writing was merely considered as a “secondary representation” of language, and was often overlooked by linguistics and language teachers. Urged by the professionalization of TESL, ESL writing…

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    English Pop Song Essay

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    should learn that language at an early age. The language that they learn will be taught as the first language that is called as a mother tongue, and as the second language that is called as the target language. These kinds of language are also being applied in learning English. For example, when the learners from Indonesia want to learn English as their target language, they should have learned Bahasa Indonesia as their first language in order to help them understand the English as their target…

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    a restaurant, to conducting a meeting in the office, or even talking with a friend. Language is an essential part of human society and everything it involves. It is assumed that linguistics involves learning lots of different languages, however, it is actually focused on the workings of language. The study of linguistics involves answering the following questions: • Why is it that we have different languages? • What is the best way to learn/teach a language • Why do languages change over time?…

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    basis of ‘simple induction’ and the like, but do not,” further allowing him to come to the conclusion that children must have an innate knowledge of language and its structure. The poverty of stimulus argument primarily takes a nativist approach to linguistic theory, as it implies that children have some innate biological way of not making high probability and logical mistakes. Crain (2012) also illustrates this point by stating the poverty-of-the-stimulus argument proves “that children know…

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    investigate how Langston Hughes expressed this mood through literary stylistics in The Weary Blues. Since linguistic criticism is used in text analysis; it concentrates on the connections between language choices and the social world (Malmkjaer 1), I am using the linguistic theory as the criticism to argue the weariness in this poem. According to the major fields of the theoretical linguistics are syntax, phonology, morphology, and semantics (Wikipedia), I have found that Langston Hughes has…

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    this lack of rigor might originate from the interdisciplinary nature of the concept and phenomenon of discrimination in that discussions concerned with discrimination often fall within areas as diverse as critical discourse analysis, critical applied linguistics, power relations, and identity (re)construction. Therefore, such discussions might not be directly related to education. Further, as each of these areas enjoys its own principles and tenets, it seems essential to borrow findings of…

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    and research on studying the linguistics of English, the theories that govern the language and the theoretical and pedagogical approaches through which such theories may be utilized in facilitating a better experience for individuals who are learning English as a second language. Motivated to relate this theoretical experience in an applicable manner, I committed to several field training activities and programs, through which I was keen to vary the theories I applied in my training, so I may…

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    The social significance of language has been claimed by Saussure (1916), the founder of modern linguistics that “speech has both an individual and a social side, and we cannot conceive of one without the other” (p. 8). He made distinction and named the grammatical system of language as langue, and the social use of language as parole. Firth (1937) also…

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    Natalie Schilling-Estes

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    As I learn more about linguistics through readings and class discussions, I have become increasingly curious about the social aspects involved in language. Natalie Schilling-Este’s chapter about dialect variation in addition to the dialect perception experiment provided insight to some of these curiosities. After reflecting upon the reading and experiment, the topics that stood out to me most were factors that contribute to language change, the social implications of dialect, and the perception…

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    therefore seemed most appropriate, as it links social constructs, such as neo-colonialism, for example, to how the French language functions ideationally and interpersonally and to how the arguments on both sides are structured. By integrating this linguistic, quantitative evidence into an overall Critical Discourse Analysis, the study allows for a qualitative evaluation of the independence issue, especially in terms of the ideologies or Foucauldian discourse formations that are obfuscated in…

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