Parietal lobe

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    Parietal Lobe

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    Parietal Lobe: The parietal lobe is vital for sensory perception and integration, including the management of taste, hearing, sight, touch, and smell. It is home to the primary sensory area, a region where the brain interprets input from other areas of the body. Because of the parietal lobe’s role in sensory integration, spatial reasoning, and language skills, damage to the parietal lobe can have a broad range of consequences. Occipital Lobe: The main functions of the occipital lobe are vision, depth perception, identifying visual stimuli-- particularly familiar faces and objects, transmitting visual information to other brain regions so that those brain lobes can encode memories, assign meaning, craft appropriate motor and linguistic responses,…

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    Parietal Lobe Injury

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    Phineas Gage is a famous individual who had his frontal lobe destroyed, afterwards he was no longer able to hold back thoughts, his friends claimed he was no longer Phineas. Phineas was a mild mannered and kind man before his injury, after it he became a rude and irritable individual. Frontal lobe injury will also affect emotions, social and sexual behaviour, memory, and language. Parietal lobe injury will affect your ability to locate and recognize parts of your body, a condition known as…

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    Parietal Lobe Study

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    It’s understandable why individuals get weary when visiting relatives undergoing neurological rehabilitation; it’s difficult to predict how they will react and often innocent intentions can be met with a harsh scolding. However, a new study suggests that a simple change in body language can have radical effects on the responses you receive and offers new rehabilitation options for patients. Despite impairment of the left visual field in patients with right parietal lobe damage, what is…

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    Parietal Lobe Case Study

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    Basic / structure nervous system (2) What lobe of the brain is associated with the processing and interpreting of visual stimuli? Answer Choices: A. Frontal lobe B. Occipital lobe C. Parietal lobe D. Temporal lobe Explanation: The occipital lobe is the primary visual processing center. It receives visual input from the retina and interpret the signal into a recognizable image. While the parietal lobe and temporal lobe are also involved in visual perception, their main role differ. The…

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    PTSD In Military

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    on everyday life, the challenges met while dealing with it, the neuroscience behind PTSD, and the effects of PTSD on everyday life. The methods I will be using while researching this topic include, that I will first look into the psychological aspects and then I will go more in depth regarding the social/life aspects. Neuroscience behind PTSD A study which was just founded in 2013 stated that people with chronic PTSD have some regions of the brain shrinking once developing the illness…

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    The brain is one of the most important parts of my body and is made of 4 major parts called "lobe". The four major parts are: frontal lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, and occipital lobe. If there is a chance I have to sacrifice one of the four lobes to survive and live without one lobe, I will sacrifice my occipital lobe. There are some functions from both the frontal lobe and parietal lobe which originate my ability to walk, which I consider the worst for me to lose it. I couldn't not…

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    Action Observation

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    They also ensured that the faces of the dancers were blurred in order to emphasize body movement. Furthermore, in order to test the assumption that differences in brain activation were due to expertise levels alone, two non-expert control groups were tested to see if they experienced similar activity levels while watching both styles of dance. If they both experienced similar activity levels then it could be concluded that any differences in action observation activity were due to differences…

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    Phantom Limb Pain

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    limb pain (PLP), if pain is also felt in this phantom limb. When studying PLS it is important to understand the role of the primary motor cortex and the primary somatosensory cotex. The primary somatosensory cortex is located in the post central gyrus of the parietal lobe posterior to the central sulcus, which separates the frontal lobe from the parietal lobe, and is responsible for receiving sensations. The sensory homunculus represents the different areas of the primary somatosensory corex…

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    audience 's performance towards the same task in which they did not do as proficient. So far half way through the video she has specified two positive impacts from video games on society.Her third example contains the same results plus a more in depth look at her investigation and live experiment for her example. Then doubles the live experiments content just to increase more proficient results to help argument. After shortly concluding her examples she goes into the facts about actual brain…

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    Memory And Episodic Memory

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    As it is explained above, any kind of modality can affect memory either in a good or bad way, and it has established that when the correct modality is obtained from an accurate source, it has been more positive going waveform than when items determined as new (Rugg and Wilding, 1996). Moreover, different modalities can create the problem to a person and make confusion which sources are experienced. Contrary to the information described above about sensory memory, Kayser, et al. (2007) claim that…

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