Hippocampus

Decent Essays
Improved Essays
Superior Essays
Great Essays
Brilliant Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Hippocampus

    • 600 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Hippocampus is a part of the brain in the Limbic System. This part is where long-term memory is stored. If this part becomes dysfunctional in any given person, he or she will be unable to form long-term memories. Therefore, that person will only have short term memory that will not change to long-term during sleep, so he or she will lose any new memories gained throughout the day. A case study that was done on this phenomenon in the 1950’s was done on Henry Molaison. He received an injury to the brain and afterwards began to suffer from epileptic seizures. To end such seizures, the doctors removed his hippocampus and adjoining brain structures. After this surgery, Molaison’s seizures were over, but his memory was forever impaired. He had…

    • 600 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Amygdala And Hippocampus

    • 1066 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The amygdala and hippocampus assume crucial parts in emotions and memory. Located in the brain, the amygdala rests on either side of the thalamus and directly below the hippocampus and dictates some emotion. When damaged, emotions do not work efficiently and the creature will become indifferent to stimuli. Also located in the brain, the hippocampus lies beneath the thalamus and controls the process of changing short-term memory to long-term memory. If damaged this will inhibit the creature from…

    • 1066 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When I read what happens when your hippocampus is damaged, my mind went to a movie I just watch. In 50 first dates Drew Barrymore plays a woman who can’t form new memories because she was in a crash in which she received a head injury. We can assume from the movie that she has injured her hippocampus. Since her hippocampus was damage it cause her to have ametrograde amnesia which means she can no longer make new long term memories since the crash. This is occurring because the switching station…

    • 317 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rat Hippocampus

    • 285 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Internally Generated Cell Assembly Sequences in the Rat Hippocampus
(Summary) It was long thought that the hippocampus was the seat of spatial navigation. However, newer models suggest that other cognitive processes such as episodic memory and action planning depend on the hippocampus. Further, these models suggest that this activity might be internally organized cell assemblies. To unpack the role of the hippocampus, these neurons predict where and animal is coming from as well as its…

    • 285 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The brain is composed of many sections, the Hippocampus being one of those sections. The Hippocampus is responsible for memory. It has been scientifically proven that the Hippocampus continues to generate new neurons, even in adulthood. While other systems do not create new neurons, it is critical that the Hippocampus does. Since the Hippocampus is responsible for processing memories, it needs to generate new neurons so that new memories can be formed. If new neurons were not being…

    • 259 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hippocampus Psychology

    • 1109 Words
    • 5 Pages

    An influx of hormones that effects the hippocampus can cause mood changes and appetite changes in a person. The effects on the hippocampus due to the change of hormones can lead to the development of an eating disorder by putting stress on the patient’s body. The hormones that lead to this mental illness are serotonin, leptin, and dopamine. These hormones help regulate hunger and change cravings in an individual which leads the patient not knowing their own hunger cues. Without hunger cues, the…

    • 1109 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The removal of the hippocampus in Henry Molaise (HM) has taught us a lot about memory. Because he was suffering from a massive amount of epileptic seizures, it was no wonder that he agreed to the surgery to gain some relief that drugs could not provide him. Understanding of the hippocampus was in its infancy in 1953 (Kalat, 2016). After the removal of his hippocampus, to a great extent, his seizures reduced radically, however, it impacted the use of his short-term and long-term memory. He…

    • 270 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Great Essays

    1. Neurogenesis and memory 1.1. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus The hippocampus is a brain region that responsible for learning, memory and mood. One of the important reasons for memory and mood dysfunction is the dentate gyrus (DG) reduction [12, 13]. The subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of neural progenitor cells generated neurons and glia in adulthood and during adulthood [14]. Neurogenesis also have a role in mood regulation; the dorsal hippocampus is an…

    • 1529 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Hippocampal Functions In Memory And Damage Forgetting a joke when you are in an opportune moment or losing a learned fact when you need it for a pop quiz you are currently taking. It just maybe the worst to forget knowledge but always remember someone has it worst. How about losing information, or just not remembering anything new anymore for the rest of your life. That is partially what it is like to have a defective hippocampus. The human hippocampus is surgically removed to help patients…

    • 1229 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    H.M. evidently showed to have full intact memory of a normal amount of information over a brief period of time, until he was distracted by intervening mental activities such as being able to normally repeat a phone number and carry on a conversation that had no reference to the past or an event left behind the talk. Several studies support that the hippocampus is highly engaged to train information across brief periods of time and activating the hippocampus contributes to subsequent memory…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50