Indigenous peoples of Oceania

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    Bungle Bungles

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    The Bungle Bungles (or Purnululu) is found and located in Purnululu, Western Australia. The Bungle Bungles is well known for the great ranges, which were only “discovered” by a film team in 1983. The cultural and spiritual significance of this landform traces back to almost 20,000 years ago. Also, the cultural and spiritual aspects of this landform is extremely vital to the vast existence of the landform itself and the people who inhabit it. The primary and original owners of this landform region are the Djaru and Kija people, who are Aboriginal. The Aboriginals who inhabit the Bungle Bungles benefit from the landform too. Australia’s indigenous people have adapted to the riverine features by moving to highlands during wet seasons (where the…

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    Ngunnawal Tribe

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    The Indigenous people whose traditional lands are the area of Canberra and the Australian Capital Territory are The Ngunnawal people (alternatively Ngunnawal tribe). First encountered by European settlers in the 1820s, the Ngunnawal people lived in an area roughly bounded by what are now the towns of Queanbeyan, Boorowa and Goulburn. The meaning of Ngunnawal is we, the people, or us and today’s spelling came from the settlers, the original spelling was Ngoonawal (rhyming with soon). The region…

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    Australian media has always been a prevalent force associated with Indigenous Australians. Ever since the mass spread of information through media was invented, it has been used as both a negative and positive way to promote certain agendas. Social media is also a mechanism that is changing the way Indigenous Australians interact and use media, and has had an important impact on Indigenous Peoples around the world. Despite many changes for the better in regards to how the media is used to…

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    arguments that make the audience reflect back on their actions and make them familiarize with the suffering the aboriginals went through after the hound of hatred and boos. Adding on, soon after the use of alliteration, Stan Grant uses the rule of three in which he describes the sound of humiliation and the years of struggle as “dispossession, injustice, suffering and survival”. The use of the rule of three triggers the mind of the audience by making them sympathize with the vicious situation…

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    through the depiction of Settlers and Indigenous custodians of Australia. It offers an intuitive outlook on land ownership, highlighting the varying attitudes and relationships each group has with the land and the concept of racial superiority. Differing cultures are thoroughly investigated throughout the film, providing understanding into the marginalisation of mainly indigenous people as well as White settlers within the film. The film portrays significant differing worldviews between the…

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    Sally's Story Analysis

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    Sally’s Story Sally’s Story illustrates the life of an average Aboriginal family in Australia. The southern British Commonwealth during that period of time was a far cry from its colonial past, where Aborigines were singled out for persecution. Yet, life for members of the Aboriginal population remains to be a struggle in a subtle but present manner. Indigenous Australians faced difficulties from greater economic hardships caused by poverty and unemployment to social stigma and discrimination,…

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    the Aboriginal people from the past and present. Many of the artists chosen for the exhibition bring to light, and focus on the Stolen Generation in their works. This will be the past part of the exhibition. The present part of the exhibition will focus on how the Aborigines have dealt with those effects of the Stolen Generations while working to fit in with white communities in the present day society of Australia. This relates to the development of Australian contemporary art because all of…

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    Social Darwinist Theory

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    The 1997 Bringing Them Home National Inquiry discusses how the Australian Government has used regulations and policies to force Indigenous children away from their families. This essay will discuss how racism in Australia has impacted the Indigenous Community. It will discuss how the Indigenous Community have been subjected to the Social Darwinist theory, the ‘constructions of race’, Assimilation policies, the Child Removal policies and ‘institutional racism’. The 1997 Bringing Them Home…

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    true, which was to stay. Maturity – The wife accepts defeat, not fighting against the situation. ‘She won’t even ask why they’re leaving this time’. She becomes subservient to her husband’s whims. Belonging – Due to the family moving quite a lot, they are unable to establish roots and connect with the community. They have their own community, because they rely on each other to feel connected. Emotion: The ambience is set is an atmospheric and sombre tone. With soft, smooth consonants and…

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    The fact that Indigenous Australians have experienced maltreatment and a deprivation of their civil liberties for generations is well-documented. In discussing the ways in which Aboriginal people and their white supporters promoted Civil Rights and Indigenous Rights in Australia from the late 1950s through to 1972, this essay will provide a representative rather than comprehensive treatment. It will begin with a brief overview of the state of affairs leading up to the late 1950s. The notion of…

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