Rhetorical Analysis Of Stan Grant's Speech

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The given extract is a speech delivered by Stan Grant on Racism and Australian dream in 2016 at Ethics Centre, Sydney, Australia. He primarily targets the audience belonging to Australia. With the use sarcastic and confronting tone speaker expresses his disappointment and serve his purpose to inform the audience about the historical brutality suffered by the aborigines with the use rhetorical questions, anaphora, and juxtaposition.
Stan Grant at the start of his speech uses rhetorical question “Who are we? What sort of country do we want to be?” and alliteration “We heard a howl. We heard a howl of humiliation” to state his arguments that make the audience reflect back on their actions and make them familiarize with the suffering the aboriginals
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He constantly quotes verses from the anthem, but then, immediately also quotes historical events, and his own personal experiences, which contrast heavily with the verse. The juxtaposition present allows the audience to see the many faults, the many differences between the apparent “Australian Dream” and reality, as, after all, the anthem is a representation of Australian’s dream. The attack combined with the juxtaposition also isolates the reader if they decide to disagree with Grant, due to the strong, negative language used to describe the Australian Dream, as it acts as a reflection on Australians themselves, and positions the reader to side with …show more content…
It compels the reader to imagine the situation those subject to racism must face. It forces readers to view the soldiers in the “War of extermination” in all their bloodlust and hate. It forces disgust upon the readers.
Grant used such language in conjunction with emotive language, to paint a picture. This appeals to an audience’s sense of sorrow, of empathy, and of disgust. A listener or reader is able to feel empathy for those Grant described, weakening any opposing view, and manipulating them to side with Grant. Further, combined with the many attacks mentioned earlier, and now feeling of disgust, the opposition is further alienated, with such emotions as disgust and hates now coming from them, Grant’s position is solidified.
He concludes by returning to the line from the Australian that he referenced at the beginning. He thus has a circular ending. But, more so, he also states that while it is true that his argument has been that "The Australian Dream" is not what it makes itself out to be, he has hopes that it could be. “And one day, I want to stand here and be able to say as proudly and sing as loudly as anyone else in this room, Australians all, let us rejoice.” He even emphasizes the "all" show that even he believes it could happen. Grant finishes with a touch of hope, claiming even though the Australian dream is what it is made out to be, it could

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