Hotel Bone Poem Analysis

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Q. 1
Write about 3 lines for each of the following about the significance for Indigenous Land Rights in Australia:

(a) “Terra nullius” Terra Nullius means that land without. When Captain Cook and his crew was in Australia , they decided the land was Terra Nullius. They acknowledge Indigenous people because of their primitive life. The High Court's Mabo judgement overturned the Terra Nullius fiction in 1982.

(b) Protective legislation Victoria enacted Aboriginal protection act. This act were being achieved in Britain and the Australian colonies. However , for Aborigines , this act gave more controls over Aboriginal people's lifestyle.
(c) the Australian Aborigines League 1933 The Australian Aboriginies league was founded in Melbourne
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3.
Read the poem “Hotel Bone” by Sam Wagan Watson.
In your own words, what is the poet telling us? 50 to 150 words. 'Hotel Bone' belongs to Samuel Wagan Watson. He has Munanjali , Birri Gubba , German , Dutch and Irish ancestors. So he has knowledge about different societies and immigrants. Hotel Bone tells us the experiences of immigrants and ethnic groups in Australian society such as Iraqi , Indonesian , Sri Lankan nd Aboriginal.They are living in some kind of shelter like gourd which is called Hotel Bone. From the outside Australia looks like pearl. But from the inside life is hard except for White settlers. The poet tells us the different space between White settlements and the others with ‘yet White faces do not come down here. ‘ The poet takes attention the 1967 referendum. This referendum is a kind of revolution for Aboriginals. The poem emphasizes this importance as life liberty for Aboriginals with’My longevity was guaranteed ,and referendum gives ‘the freedom to practice the voodoo of semantics. ‘ The poet represents multiculturalism as an airline. While different ethnic groups and immigrants in economy seating, White faces are in first-class. The society contains many
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Her words make you think and force you to look at yourself whenever you say ‘I’m not racist but …’

Q. 5
We watched two stories from the TV drama series Redfern Now: episode one “Family” and episode four “Stand Up”. Describe the issues in one or both of these stories. Say something about life for today’s urban Aboriginal people and how the TV series Redfern Now shows Indigenous people.
Use your own words as much as possible. Say a few things simply. 100 words total. Redfern Now is n Australian television series screening on BC1 in Australia. It shows contemporary stories about Indigenous Australians in the Sydney. The drama series developed by Indigenous writers, directors, producers and actors. Redfern Now tells everyday stories. But it is different than the other Australian TV series. It depicts Aboriginal and the other society in a big city. For instance in episode one there is an aboriginal family who goes on vacation. Mother’s name is Grace, and her sister’s issue prevent family’s vacation in the last minute. Grace deals with her sister’s problem, and she has to take care of sister’s children. It is an everyday

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