Brassica

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    Brassica Hypothesis

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    The genus Brassica contains thirty-seven different species, many of which provide edible parts such as roots, leaves, stems, buds, flowers, and seeds (Rakow, 2004). The Brassica species have provided much of the population 's diet, which explains their economic importance to many countries. Within the Brassica species, Canola has been a major contributor to the Canadian economy, providing over nineteen billion dollars each year, two-hundred and forty thousand Canadian jobs, and twelve and a half billion dollars in wages as told by the Canola Council of Canada (2016). With climate change occurring the future of crops around the world could be at risk, as well as the jobs that go with them . Predictions from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) include a rise in surface air temperature, more frequent and intense heat waves, and quickly…

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    Brassica rapa, better known as the Brassica campestris, which is part of the mustard family. It is originated from Europe, but is now found all around the world (Courteau, 2012). This plant can grow anywhere between 30 to 120 centimeters tall. The growth of a plant is controlled by the hormone of the plant. The hormone will send a chemical signal to the plant which allows it to grow. An example of a plant’s hormone is called gibberellin. Gibberellin (GA) is responsible for the growth and the…

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    The carrying capacity of Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica Rapa) in a 2-liter bottle growing environment Introduction In this lab we conducted an experiment in which we created a habitat in which plants grown; We will determine if the plants will grow successfully in this habitat. We will plant “Wisconsin Fast Plant”seeds, also known as (Brassica Rapa). The Wisconsin Fast Plants are a small, fragile sized plant that has a short growing period and produces seeds at a high density. We will…

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    Soil Salinity Essay

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    •Background and aim Soil salinity is one of the major environmental obstacles that limit the crop productivity. A pot experiment was conducted with an aim to explore the ameliorative effects of exogenously applied sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration against salinity stress in Brassica napus (L.) cv. Pactole. Methods Plants were grown under greenhouse conditions in plastic pots and were exposed to ***** mM NaCl. Further, ***** days old plants were sprayed with sodium nitroprusside (SNP,…

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    Chromatography Of Brassica

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    The genus Brassica is one of 51 genera in the tribe Brassiceae belonging to thecrucifer family, and is the economically most important genus within this tribe,containing 37 different species. Many crop species areincluded in the Brassica genus, which provide edible roots, leaves, stems, buds,flowers and seedCrops.Crops belonging to this genus are occasionally called Cole crops—derived from the Latin caulis, denoting the stem or branch of a plant.[1] Members of Brassica commonly used for food…

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    Brassica Rapa Seeds

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    An Investigation of the Effects of Cytokinins during the Germination of Brassica rapa Seeds Germination is a vital stage in a plants life, but it also plays a significant role in other animals’ (including humans) life cycle. It is the process in which a new plant grows from a seed. Due to the fact that plants are autotrophs; they use the process of photosynthesis to transform sunlight and make their own food. Germination occurs in gymnosperms and angiosperms when the seed is using its own…

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    Brassica Napus Synthesis

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    Cross Contamination of Brassica Napus INTRODUCTION Brassica Napus is a bright yellow flowering rapeseed that can be used to create biodiesel, animal feed and vegetable oils. As of 2009, over 90% of Brassica Napus was genetically modified to make it disease and drought resistant. The high rate of the genetic modification of this crop is due to the increased yields of the crops which in turn lead to higher economic returns for the farmers producing the Brassica Napus. (Beckie, 2011). Although…

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    of background information to know about the Brassica lab, in order to fully understand what is being tested and the mechanisms behind it. There are questions that need to be asked such as: why use Wisconsin fast plants, what gamma radiation does to organisms on a molecular level, and even what it does to organisms on a physical level. Why did we use Wisconsin fast plants for this experiment? Wisconsin fast plants are more formally known as Brassica Rapa and are rapid cycling plants. They have a…

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    Brassica Rapa Plants

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    There was a variety of materials and steps to follow to ensure that the experiment was successful. The experiment was comprised of four main parts which included, planting the F1 generation seeds, pollinating the flowers, harvesting the seeds, and germinating the seeds. This process took about a total of 13 weeks for the Brassica Rapa Plants to complete their full life cycle (Figure 4). To begin, F1 Wisconsin Brassica Rapa fast plant hybrid generation seeds made from a cross between a homozygous…

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    Brassica Oleracea Essay

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    Similarity indices and genetic distance The overall mean similarity index for Brassica oleracea accessions calculated based on all AFLP fragments amplified using Nei’s (1978) similarity index, ranged from 0.297 to 0.999 with an average of 0.744 (Table 3). The highest similarity indices (0.999) and the lowest genetic distance (0.001) were between the accessions of the same crop variety and geographical region, e.g. spring cabbage HRIGRU4564 and HRIGRU4571 from Cork. Accessions having close…

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