Arapaho

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    One November Morning was created by descendants of survivors of the Sand Creek massacre. The artwork depicts the events of that day. The works by artists Brent Learned (Arapaho), George Curtis Levi (Cheyenne), and BJ Stepp (Cheyenne) focus on the remembrance, honor and strength of their ancestors and leaders. Levi and Learned organized the exhibition which changed slightly at each venue based on which other artists could participate. In order to create this exhibition, Levi and Learned requested permission from the elders of the Northern Cheyenne, Southern Cheyenne, Northern Arapaho, and Southern Arapaho tribes. This exhibition, documentary, and program marked the first time in 150 years that the tribes had told their side of the story outside…

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    situation. Furthermore Comanche Warbands had been commonly never large enough to seriously disrupt the flow of European settlers encroaching into their lands, but until their final submission in the last decades of the 19th century, Comanche raids would continue to pose a major danger to travellers and settlements. Also, when young Comanches went to war, After they killed their enemy, they would scalp their enemy's head. After a comanches' death, they would wrap the body with a quilt. Then, they…

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    In the early morning of November 29, 1864, elements of the first and third Colorado volunteer regiments surprised hundreds of Cheyenne and Arapaho people camped on the banks of Sand Creek in southeastern Colorado Territory. That day, more than 150 Cheyennes and Arapahoes, the vast majority of them being women, children, and elderly men nominally under U.S. protection, were slaughtered by the Colorado volunteer regiments. Today, I was invited by the National Council on Public History to deliver…

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    The Arapaho Tribe

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    The Arapaho Indians are a commonly known Native American tribe. Their name according to the Pawnee means “trader” or from the Crow it means “tattooed people”. The Arapaho tribe was known to live in the eastern plains of Colorado and Wyoming. Soon after the Plains culture was put into effect the tribe decided to split into two different tribes: the Northern Arapahos and the Southern Arapahos. The Northern Arapaho continue to live in Wyoming, while the Southern Arapaho lives with the Southern…

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    Arapaho Indians The Arapaho Indians were established in the 1850s.Since 1878, the Eastern Shoshone, people lived there.The Arapaho Indians lived in the Eastern Shoshone.The Eastern Shoshone was by the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming.The Arapaho Tribe spoke in the Algonquian language. The Arapaho Indians ate every animal they saw to stay alive.The weapons they used were bows,arrows,stone ball clubs,jaw bone…

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    Hundreds of languages go extinct over the periods of time. One of those being Native American languages, which only about 154 still remain to this day. The Comanche and Arapaho tribes are two of the numerous Native American tribes in Oklahoma and Wyoming. In this essay the author appeals to the reader in order to persuade he/she that Native American Languages need to be saved by using Pathos/emotions, Ethos/ethics, and Logos/logic. Initially in the article, the author begins the appeal by…

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    There were also many atrocities committed during the massacres of the Arapaho and Cheyenne Indian tribes. The U.S. army felt that the Native Americans were inferior so they brutally hunted down innocent plains Indians like animals. Suspicion and hostility, stemming from technological and cultural differences as well as mutual feelings of superiority, destroyed relations between Native Americans and whites in North America. Distrust among the Indians, and nationalistic rivalries, bad faith, and…

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    The strongest members of the tribe had departed days before on what seemed like another hopeless attempt to hunt; an attempt to survive. Conditions had been very difficult for the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, but their fearless leaders worked frivolously to attain peace with the white troops and settlers and meet the needs of their people. On the morning of November 29, 1864 women, children, and the elderly tribe members awoke to a horrific situation that would come to be known as the Sand Creek…

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    of this chapter; Sitting Bull and his tribe, the Hunkpapa people, commenced in a sun dance. Black bear, a leader of the Northern Arapahos invited some Southern Arapahos to Tongue River. They set up camp there, and had many hunts and dances. Because of this, many tribes in the Powder River dispersed all over the Big Horn Mountains and the Black Hills. When Star Chief Connor of the U.S. Military learned that theses various tribes were scattered, he said that the Native American people “must be…

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    Messiah in which all the white people would be annihilated. This of course caused contrasting interpretations on how the Native Americans should really interact with their white neighbors. Each tribe would morphed the doctrine to follow their own mythology and interpretations. The Arapaho were one of the few tribes that vehemently followed the doctrine exactly. They were one of the two tribes to receive the delegated letter from the Messiah that stated the direct doctrine. Of course, there…

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