Comanche And Arapaho Language Analysis

Good Essays
Hundreds of languages go extinct over the periods of time. One of those being Native American languages, which only about 154 still remain to this day. The Comanche and Arapaho tribes are two of the numerous Native American tribes in Oklahoma and Wyoming. In this essay the author appeals to the reader in order to persuade he/she that Native American Languages need to be saved by using Pathos/emotions, Ethos/ethics, and Logos/logic.
Initially in the article, the author begins the appeal by detailing the harsh reality children were victim to. “The language was brought low by a deliberate policy of eradication by white authorities, who set up boarding schools where Indian children were punished for speaking their language” (Harris). White privilege
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“The Comanche Language and Cultural Preservation Committee (CLCPC) has created a dictionary, developed language courses and CDs of Comanche songs and holds annual courses in five Oklahoma towns in which large numbers of Comanche live” (Harris). Several methods such as setting up schools to teach their native language, not English (just like the Arapaho tribe has done) has laid the general foundation for reviving the Native’s dying languages. College courses have also been set up in various states which are taught in Indian. Ethos has been revealed through this attempt to revive the native tongue; By teaching college courses in Indian languages it proves potential towards the Native Americans. Potential to be able to become great successful people just like whites. Native Americans are proving themselves to whites and showing them that their language does indeed matter and is an important factor of their lives, who they are, and where they come from. These methods, stated by the author, give a sensation of appeal to the readers in which they can get a glimpse at Native American’s …show more content…
Once other people see how much effort the Indians are putting into maintaining their languages it could eventually bring support to the Native Americans. Money donations or other various ways of support can be sent to Native Americans. Foundations could potentially be developed in order to raise money for better schools, books, or even technology to provide the Indians with methods to pass on their languages to their future generations. “The group has also taught the language to some families, even going as far as to give financial incentives for some to teach their children Comanche” (Harris). The Comanche tribe has already begun teaching their youth Native languages. “At the school in Walters, the group of students represented a generational cross-section of the tribe, from young children to their parents and two elders. As a teacher recited the words for the numbers 1 to 10 in Comanche, the group repeated them and wrote them down.” Speaking their native languages at home is a very traditional aspect in Native American lives. By teaching the youth it helps to maintain that tradition and connection to their

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