Cherokee

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    Foreman argues that diseases were the main struggle for the Cherokee Tribe. In Grant Foreman’s Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians, Grant states that the Cherokee Indians “had suffered much from disease and several deaths had occurred among them” (Foreman, 256). Measles and cholera were the main diseases that affected the Cherokee population. The Cherokee even lost many of their children from cholera during their travel. Grant Foreman explains how heartbroken the parents were after losing their children from cholera during their travel. Foreman says “Parents were turning with…

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    The Cherokee Removal

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    The Cherokee Are People Too In the book The Cherokee Removal, the author argued that most of the Americans did not want the Cherokee nation to be considered equal and wanted them removed. The American people tormented the Cherokees and tried to break their spirits. The Americans thought that if the Cherokee people could be dispossessed, that they would have agreed to the removal (Purdue, 84). The Americans disrespected them and made laws that harassed them. White people moved onto their land…

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    The Cherokee Nation

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    own tribal government. The Cherokee Nation, the largest federally recognized Native American Nation, has been immersed into a political standoff between members of their own government, congress, and formally Cherokee tribal members over citizenship requirements. Citizenship for Native Americans has continually been a recurring dispute among tribe members concerning the ever-changing criteria set by tribal governments. For more than a hundred years, African/Indian mix blooded Cherokees known as…

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    Cherokee Relationship

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    adjustment in the relations between our two nations. The preservation of Cherokee sovereignty and the Cherokee people themselves is a goal of myself as a Cherokee, as well as all of the Cherokee and esteemed white members in attendance at this summit generously held at…

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    The Cherokee Removal

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    Perdue and Green’s “The Cherokee Removal, A Brief History with Documents” is an introduction to the social and political period surrounding the removal of Cherokee Indians. The authors’ inclusion of many documents, shares with readers, the Indian voices as well as key political figures’ position on sovereign governance. This complex period is successfully outlined by Perdue and Green, with a chronological account of the Indians’ first encounter with Europeans through the inevitable journey,…

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    Cherokee Patriarchy

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    There was varied response to white encroachment. John Ross mixed blood convinced the Cherokee to adopt the strategy of accommodation which he felt would increase the chance of survival. The Creek, Seminole, and Shawnee forcibly resisted. The Cherokee society shifted from traditional to more agrarian. Traditional men hunted while women engaged in farming. Their traditional matrilineal kinship system eroded where a person belonged to his or her mother’s clan. The U.S. system or patriarchy was…

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    John Ross was the chief and led the Cherokee Nations through all of their tough times. The general council was also responsible for making any agreements and negotiations with the United State’s government. The delegation, a total of twenty people, with officials such as Ross, McCoy Gunter, and William Rogers would go to meetings and make decisions with the United States. Although the leaders of the nation respected each other, they had different opinions among the Treaty of New Echota. Some…

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    Americans. Cherokee legend says that the Cherokee came from the far away northwest. Centuries ago, some people probably did come from Siberia. Some moved further south and became known as the Indians of South America. Many stayed in North America. The Cherokee Indians had lived in the lands of what is now the United States for thousands of years before any colonists had ventured to their lands. Little did they know that the new nation that was going to be forming around them and would affect the…

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    Essay On Cherokee Tribe

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    and forced to march to new land. That is exactly what the Cherokee tribe had to go through. The Cherokee Tribe wanted peace with the United States and wanted to live peacefully without battles, however Andrew Jackson, who was currently president, wanted the Cherokee Tribe out. The Cherokee Tribe even went to Supreme Court so they would not be forced out of their land, but it was the president’s orders to force the tribe out. So, they packed what they had and they started their long journey…

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    Ethnography Report – Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma The tribe I’ll be discussing throughout my ethnography report are the Cherokee Indians. There are three sub-tribes to the Cherokee’s which are the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees. Although they all originate from the same tribe/settlement, I’m going to be discussing the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Today, this tribe of Cherokee’s live within 14 counties of Northeastern Oklahoma.…

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