Five Civilized Tribes

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    Five Civilized Tribes

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    given the power to regulate the interstate commerce by the U.S. Constitution’s Commerce Clause in the decision of this case. As a result of this case, more powers were granted to the Federal Government of United States to conduct the trade and commerce throughout the states of America. Although it was also held in the decision that the powers granted to the federal government will be limited however the limits were not defined in the decision. d. The Five Civilized Tribes The Five Native American Nations were known as Five Civilized Tribes. These tribes include Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw, Seminole and Chickasaw. The Anglo-European settlers during the early federal and colonial period considered these Native American nations civilized because many of the customs of the colonists were adopted by them. Most of the Native Americans of these tribes were descendants of Mississippian culture. All these tribes were compelled to move to the Indian Territory by the Federal government of U.S. Thus from the southeastern territory these tribes moved to the western part of the America. e. Seneca Falls…

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    Depending on the tribe, location, history, lifestyle and external influences each story contained its own unique variation. The following will compare and contrast the Cherokee and Navajo belief in creation as well as delve into the viewpoints of each tribe and their relationship with the earth, animals and other people. It is hard for a person to understand why particular cultures act and believe the way they do without understanding their belief and history. The Cherokee Indians told…

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    The whole Cherokee nation was not involved with the Confederates, though. The Cherokees were divided in half and some fought with the Union soldiers. Many other tribes from the Northern United States were; portions of the Creek and Seminole, Kickapoo, Seneca, Shawnee, Iroquois, and many more. Principal Chief John Ross and Stand Watie were rivals. Chief Ross believed that if they remained neutral, they would have a better outcome. Stand Watie was a member of the Confederacy. Their rivalry…

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    Grant Foreman discusses the tragic events that occurred during the Cherokee’s travel to Indian Territory in the 1830s. Grant Foreman argues that diseases were the main struggle for the Cherokee Tribe. In Grant Foreman’s Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians, Grant states that the Cherokee Indians “had suffered much from disease and several deaths had occurred among them” (Foreman, 256). Measles and cholera were the main diseases that affected the Cherokee…

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    (Green & Perdue, 1). They were constantly moving around involuntarily. The Cherokee tribes were often forced to leave their land when Americans found use of the land that the Cherokees were living on. White Americans were wanting their land because they found gold, wanted their livestock and they were able to evict the Cherokees out of their homes” (Green & Perdue, 92) The process of removal of the Cherokees was not a fair removal, because the Americans were taking away their control of the land…

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    In the chapter, On the Illinois: The Making of Modern Music and Culture in the Oklahoma Ozark Foothills, The Oklahoma Ozark area is a physical and cultural transition zone between the Great Plains and the eastern woodlands. This area has been considered home to many of the Cherokee people since their removal by U.S. soldiers and settlers beginning in the 1820s (pg. 239). The Cherokees has lived in the Oklahoma Ozark area longer than any other ethnic group compared as of currently. The Cherokees…

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    Indian Removal Act In 1828 Andrew Jackson had own presidency and had succeed by changing things with the government. One of many was him having a special relationship with the common people. He removed about 10 percent of workers and replaced with loyal friends and followers. In the 1800’s Native Americans had been living next to white neighbors, taking on their culture. The white settlers had wanted the Native Americans land for farming. Jackson had decided to remove all Native Americans from…

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    The African-American Dream The African American communities began to gather into Indian Territory, creating towns after the Civil War when the former slaves of the Five Civilized Tribes settled together (Black Communities After The Civil War). They settled closely because they needed each other for security purposes on both economic and safety levels. These “All-Black towns” affected Oklahoma greatly when the Land Run of 1889 created more so-called “free land” (Larry). Founders of these towns…

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    Composed of five, and later six tribes, (or nations), the Iroquois lived in the eastern woodlands as far back as 1000 A.D. The Iroquois lived in the Eastern Woodlands, in what is now New York. Their land was comprised of large forests located just south of Lake Ontario. The land was east of the Finger-Lakes along the Mohawk River (among other rivers). The Iroquois land was bordered by Algonquin land, resulting in much fighting over hunting lands. The Iroquois lived in Long-Houses and…

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    Tribal Communities

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    Tribal communities, in the Amazon Basin, are rooted in tradition. These traditions may seem very foreign to Western cultures, but these tribal societies are now changing rapidly to defend the place they call home through use of technology and languages familiar to our culture. The advancement attempts made the the communities may not be enough; specific communities have been forced to take aggressive measures. The Amazon Basin and its forests are said to be in danger from ventures such as…

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