Cherokee Removal Research Paper

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Cherokee people lived all over the land before the United States even existed. “The Cherokees lived on land extending from North Carolina to South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama for hundreds of years” (Green & Perdue, 1). They were constantly moving around involuntarily. The Cherokee tribes were often forced to leave their land when Americans found use of the land that the Cherokees were living on. White Americans were wanting their land because they found gold, wanted their livestock and they were able to evict the Cherokees out of their homes” (Green & Perdue, 92) The process of removal of the Cherokees was not a fair removal, because the Americans were taking away their control of the land which left the Cherokees to stand up …show more content…
The Cherokees were in control of their ideas, housing, and government. “Henry Knox understood the Cherokee people because he had several years of experience in Indian matters. Knox also believed that the tribes were independent and had the right to self-govern themselves in their borders” (Green & Perdue, 10). Knox tried to be on the Indians side for the most part, but sometimes he had to make some sacrifices to please other people. “Henry Knox decided that any land that would be purchased from the Indians had to be done through a treaty and he would take steps to “civilizing”the Indians” (Green & Perdue, 10-11). The Cherokees had a lot of pressure upon them about leaving the land. “The idea of Cherokees being civilized was not going to happen fully because of the new pattern of racist thought” (Green & Perdue, 15). The Cherokees were the most civilized Indian tribe, so they did not understand why they were being justified for removal for the American citizens. Andrew Jackson said “making treaties with the Indians was absurd, so the best way to get the land from the Cherokees was to just take the land” (Green & Perdue, …show more content…
“The Old Settlers wanted the newcomers to live under their new government” (Green & Perdue, 168). The Newcomers did not like this idea because they should all consider themselves equal and live together, not under each other. The newcomers ended up killing the three leaders.
The Cherokees believed they deserved the land they owned and bettered the land. Although Cherokee removal is not fair for the Cherokees all of the time, they have to make sacrifices and try to make treaties with people that will work in their favor. “Cherokee removal remains a central event in the historical consciousness of modern Cherokees. People nowadays tell stories about Cherokee removal, and feel for the Cherokees loss of their ancestral land. Cherokees proved their rights through treaties and documents, but after standing their ground for long and being miserable they ended up moving to new

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