Andrew Jackson's Democracy In The United States

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The election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828 brought a feeling of hope to the common people of the United States. He was the first president who did not come from wealthy origins, making him a more relatable politician who would seemingly fight for the rights of the lower class. Jackson was known as a supporter of a strong federal government, though he made decisions supporting states’ rights throughout his presidency. He constantly changed how he felt about certain issues based on how they would benefit the country. Even though Andrew Jackson did change the United States’ democracy for the better, his fluctuating views regarding the Nullification Controversy, Native Americans, and the rechartering of the National Bank made it appear …show more content…
In 1830, Jackson put forth The Indian Removal Act, which proposed that all of the Native Americans living east of the Mississippi River would be moved west, into Indian Territory. Through this, Jackson believed that he was helping the Indians because in his opinion, having settlers and Indians living in close proximity was not beneficial to either group (“Indian Removal Act” 1). This Act was controversial because many Native American tribes were already promised land, which they were now being forced to leave (“Indian Removal Act” 2). The Cherokee Indian tribes living in Georgia were strongly against the Indian Removal Act due to a treaty with the state claiming that they could keep their land as long as they wanted if they assimilated into American culture (O’Brien 3). The Cherokee tribes had kept their end of the treaty by speaking English and sending their children to schools, but the state of Georgia wanted the land because they had found gold there and the land was fertile for growing cotton. (“The Andrew Jackson Administrations” 7). The matter was taken to court in the case of Worcester v. Georgia, and Judge John Marshall ruled that Georgia must honor their prior treaty with the Cherokee. Even though Jackson had previously shown support for a strong federal government, he strongly supported Georgia in this issue. He encouraged them to ignore Marshall’s ruling, saying “John Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it.” (Friedline 5). In saying this, Jackson was refusing to support the decision of the court and going against the federal government. The Cherokee were ordered to move off of their land, and were forced to walk from Georgia to Indian Territory. Over four thousand Indians died during this trip that was later called The Trail of Tears (“The Andrew Jackson Administrations” 10). Jackson had previously expressed

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