Cherokee

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    Cherokee Tribe Analysis

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    The Cherokee were one of the largest Native American tribes who settled in the Southeast portion of the United States. The tribe came from Iroquoian descent. They had originally been from the Great Lakes region of the country, but eventually settled down closer to the east coast including Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, the Carolinas, and the Virginias. They were a strong tribe with several smaller sections, all being lead by chiefs. The Cherokee nation prided themselves on being polite and…

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    Cherokee Removal Essay

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    Americans subjected the Cherokee to harsh treatment and force migration during the Jacksonian era known as the Trail of Tears. The controversy and debate surrounding Cherokee removal reached national level and is often cited for President Andrew Jackson’s hate for Native Americans. The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents edited by Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green provides a collection of documents dealing the controversial issue of forced migration of the Native Americans…

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    The Cherokee Indians had lived in northwest Georgia, but in the 1800s many whites begin to settle there. Georgia believed the state had the right to this land because it was within the borders of Georgia, but the Cherokee Indians had lived there for centuries and felt they had a right to the land. Many Cherokees adapted a more American lifestyle and some became plantation owners or store owners. The Cherokee Nation also created a constitution that was similar to the Constitution of the United…

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    Smoky Mountains which stretched through North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia. In the first paragraph, I will talk about the Cherokee villages. In Cherokee villages, there was an wall to keep intruders out of their territory. There were over 100 villages in the Cherokee nation, they were all connected by the great cherokee path. Cherokee villages had several large cornfields, to feed plants they stay next to bodies of water. Cherokee’s would have summer and winter houses to…

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    Essay On Cherokee Removal

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    in Georgia because the United States wanted Cherokee land. Historians today still debate about whether the Cherokees should have stayed or left. Cherokee representatives believed that the United States will let them stay, while Boudinot believed that they should leave otherwise the United States would force them out in a violent way. One reason why removal offered the best chance for Cherokee survival is that if they stayed, they would lose their Cherokee civilization. On October 2nd, 1832,…

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    Removal Paper While most White Americans supported the Cherokee removal in 1830, many White Americans disagreed with the removal. Many people viewed the Removal as unconstitutional because it infringed on the Cherokees rights as a Sovereign nation. Both the British and American governments had established, in multiple treaties, that the Cherokee were a Sovereign nation. Meaning that land could only be taken by the United States if the Cherokee nation submitted themselves or their land on to the…

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    Cherokee Indian Removal

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    Composition 112 March 2, 2017 The Treacherous Journey of the Trail of Tears Before the British came over to the Americas, the Cherokee Indians, among many other tribes, inhabited these rolling hills, mountains, and plains. Unfortunately, they were removed from their homeland very viciously. The removal of Cherokee Indians is referred to as the Trail of Tears. The journey of the Cherokee Indians from before their removal, their fight to not be removed, their travel conditions, and the actual…

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    Cherokee Tribe Beliefs

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    “Cherokee Tribe” Did you know that there are more than 100 tribes all around the United States? If you didn't know, now you do! One of the most popular trips is the Cherokee. The Cherokee tribe has an estimated population of 300,000 people which are among different states such as: Oklahoma (being the most populated), South and North Carolina, Tennessee, etc. The Cherokees have lots of aspect similar to the regular American, such as in their language (english) and their religion (christianity).…

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    Speech On Cherokee Culture

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    the idea of the construction of a Cherokee Museum, which will be carried out with the Federal Grant we have been provided. The purpose of said edification is to present Cherokee culture to the public, using novel technology to illustrate Cherokee history and traditions. As you may know, there are several misconceptions and myths surrounding this indigenous group; therefore, our goal should be to inform these present generations about the reality of the Cherokee, their relevance as members of…

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    Cherokee Indian Burial

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    Transitions to a New World Cherokee ceremonial and burial rites are held very sacred and with highest of respects. The Cherokee Indians who are descendants of their sister tribe the Iroquois, lived in the southeastern parts of the United States until forced off their land and onto reservations during the mid-1800s. The Cherokees were forced to sacrifice many of their customs and rites, by the White European settlers which considered it Paganistic according to their Christian religion. Surviving…

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