Essay On Cherokee Tribe

Improved Essays
Imagine being forced out of a home and forced to march to new land. That is exactly what the Cherokee tribe had to go through. The Cherokee Tribe wanted peace with the United States and wanted to live peacefully without battles, however Andrew Jackson, who was currently president, wanted the Cherokee Tribe out. The Cherokee Tribe even went to Supreme Court so they would not be forced out of their land, but it was the president’s orders to force the tribe out. So, they packed what they had and they started their long journey west. There were about 16,000 Indians who had to move or be punished. The government imprisoned the Native Americans who refused to move and even killed some of them, the rest of the Indians marched west to hopefully survive …show more content…
The tribe formed a Nation for the Cherokee Tribe and had peace. They eventually began building roads and becoming civilization again. The Cherokee tribe even developed a school to teach the children of the tribe. The civilization was at their capital that they formed called Tahlequah. The tribe had their own capital, and their own civilization and the violence was finally over, until years later. The Cherokee Tribe believed in peace throughout the whole experience, but the Civil War was hard to have peace with. John Ross, the leader of the Cherokee Tribe, decided to meet with the president, Abraham Lincoln, to discuss the war. John did not want the Cherokee Tribe to be neutral and unheard anymore. The Cherokee Tribe signed treaties with the Confederacy and did not sign any other treaties from other sides of the war. John wanted the Cherokee Tribe to have land to be their home. In 1866, John signed a treaty that meant the Cherokee Tribe would always have land and a home. The Cherokee Tribe had a good end, but a rough start with the Trail of Tears. The Trail of Tears was brutal and unforgiving to the people of the Cherokee Tribe. The members that died were not forgotten by the members that survived, and they never will

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Reconstruction was suppose to help the citizens. However, it failed and left racial justice problems that people faced in the future. After the civil war, the North gave free slaves right to vote, which they were unfit to handle. Before his death, Lincoln was willing to forgive the southern states and bring them back in the Union. Lincoln even refused to sign the Wade- Davis Bill, which mandated strict requirement for the south before they could make their new government.…

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After the Nebraska and Kansas act of 1854, the problems between the North and the South grew. Lincoln’s confessed that his true goal was to stop the expansion of slavery from spreading into other territories within the nation. As war broke out, he was compelled by the Northern states and abolitionists to stress that the Union army’s main war focus was on freedom. The only problem was, Lincoln want to focus on the save the Union and reinstate the national authority over the South once more. President Lincoln wanted to preserve the Union over freeing the slaves, multiple of times he expressed his want to bring the country back together and forget about freeing the slaves entirely.…

    • 993 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Indian Removal Act, signed into laws by Andrew Jackson and congress in 1830 ratified an agreement to move all Native tribes west of the Mississippi in exchange for the lands they currently held. The exchange that Andrew Jackson had proposed in December of 1829 was a voluntary transfer, one that must be ratified by both parties and could not forced upon the Cherokee. However, Jackson made it clear that any resistance to the laws would be met with force. Other tribes signed treaties with the US government some time after the ratification of the Indian Removal Act; the Cherokee resisted their removal by legal means. They argued that the anti-Cherokee laws that Georgia had enacted sometime after gold was found on Cherokee land were unconstitutional and won their case in 1832.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Andrew Jackson's Democracy

    • 2027 Words
    • 9 Pages

    When the government of Georgia refused to recognize their autonomy and threatened to seize their lands, the Cherokees took their case to the U.S. Supreme Court and won a favorable decision. John Marshall ruled that the Cherokee Nation was under the protection of the US government and therefore must remain that way, since they had created treaties with the Federal government. The unjustified part to this is that Georgia officials ignored the decision, and President…

    • 2027 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Congress thought that by signing the bill, they were saving the Natives from extinction. The general public, however, was opposed to Indian Removal. Religious groups and benevolent societies help town meetings in the Northern states “demanding justice for the Native Americans.” In addition, they also submitted hundreds of petitions and memorials as a form of demanding justice for the Native Americans. Jackson started the process of removal, “By personally negotiating immigration agreements with the southern tribes…” When the Natives decided to move, they set way to the West. The Choctaws were only accompanied by two missionaries.…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He could not find enough warriors that would fight, they all just wanted to be at peace and felt they should not fight and cause any new problems for them. They kept signing new treaties each time we would move them off their land and make promises which we never would keep. Tecumseh still could not get his fellow tribesmen to rally together to fight. But day his younger brother who they thought had drunk himself to death. He woke up and said he had a vision and that the Indians should go back to their old Indian traditions and leave all things good and bad that the whites or Americans had given them behind and he his younger brother became a medicine and holy man and together they would campaign for the Indians to come…

    • 1156 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Benefits Of Coercion

    • 1268 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This shows that Jackson hated people like Cherokees that question his authority. So, he is in favor of removing all Indians from the South to grab more lands for the whites (Jones, 277). In 1830, the Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, which provided an exchange of lands with the Indians in any of the territories, and their removal from the west of the Mississippi (Jones, 277). The Cherokee nation refused to sign the removal treaties. Georgia lacked the authority to remove Indians from their lands, but that didn’t stop the president from sending troops to Georgia to force them off their homelands in 1832.…

    • 1268 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    At first during Reconstruction, Lincoln was president and he had no plans of letting any confederates back into the political or military field anytime soon. This all changed when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated and Andrew Johnson became the president. Andrew Johnson was born a southerner so he tended to not want to punish the South too harshly. When the South realized that all they were getting was basically a slap on the wrist, they decided to try and take control of their government once again. Former confederates took back their prior roles in the southern government and meanwhile, Johnson was just hoping that the rest of the post-war problems would work themselves out.…

    • 1563 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The southerners had left the slaves behind to take care of the homes so that they could go and fight. Some slaves were even brought to the war, but weren’t allowed to fight because the war was known as a white man's war for some time. When Lincoln issued the Proclamation he made sure that the Confederate States would lose some power. Before the Proclamation, Europeans were considering to support the Confederate States so that they would gain control of land in the western part of the world, but many of these Europeans were abolitionists. To stop Europeans from interfering with American affairs, Lincoln made sure the Proclamation got to Europe.…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Territorial Expansion DBQ

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The most notorious case of the Indian removal was the Trail of Tears, in which President Jackson ignored the ruling of the Supreme Court and forced the Cherokee nation to relocate. During the harsh winter, the Cherokee walked through four different states (Doc D) to reach the American Indian Reservation in Oklahoma. This event illustrates another president creating his own policy as he disregards the government’s founding laws. Even though Jackson’s decision was mostly disliked, followers supported him by stating “the Cherokees have resisted, and successfully too, every effort to meliorate [improve] their situation, or to introduce among them the most common arts of life” (Doc C). The Indians “moral and their intellectual condition have been equally stationary” and…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays