Cherokee

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    Act, the Cherokee Tribe was recognized by the Government as their own nation. Gold was another reason that Americans were so eager to get them off their land. Once the white settlers discovered there was gold on Cherokee land, they began to push them out. At the time, Army general Andrew Jackson was an activist of “Indian removal.” He had spent years leading vicious campaigns against the Native Americans which resulted in hundreds of thousands of acres of land being taken from…

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    Andrew Jackson impacted the lives of Indians after he signed the Indian removal act of 1830. This was supposed to be a peaceful process for the Indians, but caused many problems, and forced Indians off of their land. There were protests from both Indians and whites who did not agree with the Indian Removal Act, but whites wanted more land. The Indian Removal Act was a turning point in American history because of its impacts in Indian culture, Native relationships with Americans, and the creation…

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    Selflessly, Worcester did not make the case only about himself and his unfair conviction, but the question concerning whether the state of Georgia can constitutionally force their authority over who the Cherokee tribe has relations with, and who the Cherokee allow on their land, as well. At the end of the trial, it was concluded by Chief Justice John Marshall that since Worcester was “within the said territory so recognized as belonging to the said nation and so, as aforesaid,…

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    Indian Removal Injustice

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    United States government against the indigenous peoples of America, perhaps no other effort can compare to the implementation and aftermath of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 for sheer sinister deliberation. By the end of the 1840s, an estimated 16,000 Cherokee indians were forced to leave their homes, 4,000 of whom died along the way from east of the Mississippi to Oklahoma (Teaching History.org, home of the National History Education Clearinghouse., n.d.). In the year 1828, Andrew Jackson…

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    Essay On Beadwork

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    People have always wondered about my affection for beautiful necklaces, exquisite earrings, and one of a kind rings. This infatuation comes from a history of Cherokee beadwork jewelry, where ancestors crafted handmade beads into rare jewelry. Native Americans created the earliest form of jewelry known to North America, although much of their creations have gone unknown due being undocumented. Some forms of native art are more mainstream to current society, such as the silver jewelry with…

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    Indian Removal

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    natives health and spirit. (Boggs 30) Most of the Cherokee had to walk the nearly 1,000 miles to their new home. Few were given the opportunity to ride horses along the way because the soldiers had stolen the horses. Because of these adverse conditions Cherokee died along the Trail…

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    Tsuny,” as the Cherokee call it, refers to trails they walked during the forced mass movement of Cherokee people to Indian Territory in Arkansas and Oklahoma. (Hook, 6-8) It was a tragic event in the history of the United States. When European explorers first came to America and encountered the Native Americans, the Native Americans were very friendly towards them. But these Europeans brought diseases such…

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    Wilma Mankiller Biography

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    Wilma Mankiller became principal chief of the Cherokee Nation in December 1985, after Ross Swimmer was asked to lead the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She was chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1985 to 1995. Mankiller faced many obstacles as the first female principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. The main challenge she faced was opponents who argued that a woman should not be the chief of the Cherokee Nation. She was also criticized for focusing on social issues and for not creating establishments…

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    In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act. This gave the federal government the right to force the Cherokee nation into giving up all of its land east of the Mississippi River. The plan was for the Native Americans to migrate west to an area that today is known as Oklahoma. The Indians negotiated with the government for reimbursement of their ancestor’s hard work and investments.The government would give them $5 million for all of their land east of the Mississippi River,…

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    Cherokees In Modern Life

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    Carolina where the descendants of the Eastern Band managed to avoid removal; and a joint council of the Cherokee Nation takes place at Red Clay in Tennessee, the site of the last council meeting before removal. Besides, the Cherokees live through impassable roads leading to four communities, including Big Cove, the most remote and traditional community, which is about twelve miles to the northeast of Cherokee City. It is a secluded little pocket surrounded by forests and irregular ridges. In…

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