Indian Removal

1871 Words 8 Pages
natives were not given time to gather supplies for the journey. Instead the troops would come into their villages and hurriedly gather them so the soldiers could steal everything that remained in the villages. This also meant that in the camps natives had little access to food or water. In addition to this, the natives were not allowed to leave the camp for any reason. This made for very unsanitary conditions. All of these factors combined to greatly weaken the natives health and spirit. (Boggs 30) Most of the Cherokee had to walk the nearly 1,000 miles to their new home. Few were given the opportunity to ride horses along the way because the soldiers had stolen the horses. Because of these adverse conditions Cherokee died along the Trail …show more content…
They did not see why they should leave the land that they had lived so long on and had taken such great care of. John Rose one of the Principal chiefs of the Cherokee opposed the treaty and seeked a more diplomatic solution to the conflicts between the Americans and his people.(Freed 109) Rose wished to assimilate the two cultures so that his people could become citizens therefore would be safe. Rose’s ideology did not bode well with the Americans do to the fact they did not want the two cultures to assimilate they wished for the natives to just adopt their culture or leave.(Johnson …show more content…
Many historians consider this event one of the greatest displays of racism in United States history. This event marks the movement away from seeing the natives as a resource to seeing them as an ongoing burden that still exists today. (McGill 14) On the Trail of Tears the natives lost a lot more than just their land. They also lost their way of life, traditions, and spirit. (Madaras 194) Along the Trail of Tears over 12,000 natives lost their lives due to the poor conditions, lack of sanitation, and the exhaustion. Over 60,000 Native Americans were removed from their land in just one year with an additional 15,000 in the following ten years. This unjust act of cruelty shocked the Native culture and changed them from a very successful, self-sufficient people to a beaten down and abused population. This event would be something that the Native American culture would never truly recover from. (McGill

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