Cherokee Chief John Ross: Cherokee Nations

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John Ross was the chief and led the Cherokee Nations through all of their tough times. The general council was also responsible for making any agreements and negotiations with the United State’s government. The delegation, a total of twenty people, with officials such as Ross, McCoy Gunter, and William Rogers would go to meetings and make decisions with the United States. Although the leaders of the nation respected each other, they had different opinions among the Treaty of New Echota. Some felt that that giving away their land was giving away the only thing that had for their nation. Others felt that their plan of giving away their land was smart because they would receive nearly five million dollars in return. Cherokee chief John Ross’

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