Antibiotic resistance

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    animals are administered sub-therapeutic doses of antibiotics so that meat industries can profit more. Because of this, a spread of resistant diseases become more likely, bacteria develop into different forms in livestock, and humans could become resistant to antibiotics due to consuming the tampered meats. Meat industries believe that bigger is better; though their demand for quicker meat production puts not only the health of the antibiotic-ingested animals at risk, but also the health of the…

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    bacterium to lyse” (Sulakvelidze et al., 2001). Its effect on bacteria make the bacteriophage a possible new treatment for antibiotic resistant superbugs. Golkar et al. (2013) discuss the various advantages bacteriophage therapy offers over antibiotics. They are “very specific to their hosts”, meaning they can be easily manipulated to detect a specific bacterial infection. Antibiotics, on the other hand, cannot be controlled in such a way. They kill both pathogenic bacteria and normal human…

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    defenses. In the case of fungi, specifically the Penicillium genus, their chemical defenses are against bacteria, in the form of antibiotics. In the early 20th century, scientists adapted these chemicals into antibiotics for human consumption (Wennergren 141). Since then, antibiotic use has grown tremendously, and they are now being used to treat bacterial infections in…

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    Antibiotics are substances that can destroy or prevent the growth of the bacteria and cure infections. In 1928, Alexander Fleming who was a Scottish biologist, pharmacologist, and botanist found the first antibiotic, penicillin, in the world. It was a significant discovery in the medical field. During the World War II, the penicillin had saved many lives. According to PBS, “400 million units of pure penicillin were manufactured” and “650 billion units a month” were produced by the end of 1945…

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    Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic. Flash forward to ninety years later- nearly every home has not one, but multiple television sets, there are hundreds of coast-to-coast radio networks as well as digital networks, and on average 4 out of every 5 Americans will be prescribed some for of antibiotic…

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    C Difficile Research Paper

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    Difficile) is a bacteria that contributes to many diseases, the spectrum of disease can range from mild cases of diarrhea to more life threatening cases like pseudomembranous colitis to toxic megacolon (Kelly 2008). Since the 1970s the use of certain antibiotics such as clindamycin to treat other infectious diseases was shown to lead to more toxic strains of C. difficile. Starting in the 1980s, cephalosporins, were the new drug of preference to treat other infectious diseases, and again was…

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    Bonnie Bassler, an American molecular biologist, once stated, “When antibiotics became industrially produced following World War II, our quality of life and our longevity improved enormously. No one thought bacteria were going to become resistant” (Bassler, 2002). Bassler suggests how antibiotics can improve our livelihoods by treating health issues. However, there may be a long-term problem associated with increased usage of antibiotics, as there can be additional disease risks with the rise of…

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    purpose of the act is to give these antibiotic-prescribing drug companies the ability to catch up to their investment costs to allow them to continue in research of other possible antibiotic solutions (Chin). In 2014, President Obama proposed an executive order to issue a five year National Action Plan to combat antibiotic resistance that should include measurements of their progress (Chin). After doubling the available federal funds of control of antibiotic resistance in March 2015, the…

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    Antimicrobial resistance has been increasing throughout recent years. One reason is due to a prevalent use of antibiotics as growth stimulants in livestock. The bacteria in the livestock become resistant due to constant exposure to the antibiotics. When the meat harvested from these animals is packaged and sold, the bacteria are now exposed to the human population. This bacterium can make its way into the human body and cause various illnesses. Illnesses that were once easily cured with…

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    Introduction Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to the health and wellbeing of the population. Antibiotic resistance has posed challenges to the public health community, while negatively impacting the general population (Another sentence of two about antibiotic resistance in general, the increasing trends and some figures). Today, carbapenemase producing-carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CP-CRE) is a group of gram-negative bacteria that are challenging public health professionals…

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