Antibiotic resistance

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    Antibiotic Resistance Issue Background In the daily life, we will hear a variety of drug tolerance. Some of them happens on the body, per se. For example, diabetes patients’ long-term use of insulin will reduce the efficacy of insulin. And abuse of pain reliever for those chronic pain patients declines the effects as well. Differently, antibiotic resistance produces tolerance towards pathogen in the body rather than the organism itself. Plus, the pathogen will spread—that is why antibiotic…

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    The Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria Bacterial infections are a leading cause of death all over the world, especially in children and the elderly, whose immune systems are not at their peak. The discovery of antibiotics in the 1940s provided doctors with a powerful weapon against harmful bacteria, often times by inhibiting their protein synthesis or cell wall formation. Within a few years of their use against certain bacteria, however, some antibiotics’ effectiveness began to…

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    Antibiotic resistance also known as Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is when bacteria acquire the ability to resist the destructive and lethal effects of an antibiotic. New strains of resistant bacteria appear via mutations that introduce an antibiotic resistant gene and then evolve by “Survival of the Fittest". In presence of antibiotics, alleles providing bacteria with resistance are under strong selective pressure. Hence, surviving strains will be in a competition free environment, they will…

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    waking up and taking your prescribed antibiotics and discovering they are no longer working? This is an antibiotic you rely on for your health. Sadly this is becoming a reality for many individuals. Simple infections are becoming harder to treat due to antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance has caused a major health issue around the world. As bacteria continues to adapt, it has become more difficult for antibiotics to properly treat infections. Antibiotics are prescription medications…

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    Antibiotic Resistance Introduction: One of the challenges affecting the medical world is antibiotic resistance. This is a concern because antibiotics have been used for decades to treat hundreds of diseases. I was able to find two articles that go over this issue. The first one was found on http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/about.html and the second on http:/x/www.medicinenet.com/antibiotic_resistance/article.htm. These articles are informative. They help answer some of the important questions…

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    If antibiotic resistant infections were reduced “by just 20 percent, [the population] would save 3.2 to 5.2 billion dollars... each year.” (Medical) The seriousness of antibiotic resistance is becoming increasingly evident and is gaining global attention to the point of being recognized on epidemic levels. Antibiotics were made to aid the body’s immune system and fight off bacteria, however studies are being conducted proving that antibiotics may be harmful and not always necessary; therefore,…

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    Antibiotic Resistance

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    Another method in which antibiotic resistance occurs is via the freezing of polymorphisms (Eric D. Brown and Gerald D. Wright 2016). Polymorphisms are discontinuous variations in gene which results in numerous types of individuals within a species an example being the variations that exist between the single Canisfamiliaris species of dog. In the case of antibiotic resistance, freezing of certain polymorphisms means that bacte1ia cells who have variation which adequate makes up for fitness…

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    A Political Resolution to Antibiotic Resistance Through the 20th century, antibiotics became the innovation that allowed the flourishing existence of human beings, where it was critical in the control of infection and allowed for stronger medical procedures that had invariably extended life. From its beginnings with Alexander Fleming’s discovery of the uses of penicillin (a widely used antibiotic), it has been considered a “wonder drug” with its widespread popularity post World War II, becoming…

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    Antibiotics have become such a commonly used medicine; some may consider it as regularly used as Tylenol. This thought does not seem that outrageous, but the overuse of antibiotics is quite an epidemic. Antibiotic use is even more of a worry because of the fact that people ignore the need to act on the problem of over-prescribing antibiotics to patients. Some people believe the over-prescription of antibiotics by doctors is not a detriment to society and their immune systems, but rather a…

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    The heretical concept of antimicrobial resistance: In mid 1950 which is known to be one of the most significant year of Medical science when genetically transferred antibiotic resistance was identified in Japan and a theory has established on the basis of scientific data is that during Bacterial conjugation resistance genes or r genes are propagated from one strain to an entire population. Therefore Bacterial Genome evolution has started taking place as one of the major fields in Microbiology,…

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