Haitian Creole language

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    Stereotypes In Haiti

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    citizens and government’s act. I think there is a chance that these stereotypes can affect foreign aid and foreign policy,” Craemer says. Yes, Haiti as some bad parts like some countries in the USA, there is no such thing as a perfect country. Haiti is full of beautiful beaches and providences, many people go to Haiti for a month and return as a whole different person. Most of the time when someone discovers that a Haitian is in the medical field they are shocked and ask themselves how could it…

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    We flew into mainland Haiti, but the village we go to, Sous A Philippe, is on a little island called La Gonave about 6 miles off of the mainland coast. So we took a 6 hour boat ride out on the bluest water I have ever seen. Arriving on the island was surreal. Seeing the village and the people for the first time was overwhelming. They greeted us with such warmth. The children know no stranger; they immediately ran up to us, took our hands, and started babbling on in Haitian creole (their native…

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    Summary: Risk Comparison

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    Haiti is a low-income Caribbean country with a population of close to 10.7 million. (Overview of Haiti, 2017) Haitian Creole and French are the official languages. According to research foreign investors have major concerns with market challenges for Foreign Direct Investment(FDI) inflows. They were estimated in 2015 to only have an inflow of 104 million dollars for the entire country. (Overview of Haiti, 2017) Haiti is known for having very high port fees. Which makes it very difficult for…

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    The essay “Dyaspora”, by Joanne Hyppolite, concentrates on the author’s early life and her experiences in discovering her identity as a Haitian American. In the essay Dyaspora, it speaks of a Haitian girl that was born in Haiti, but brought up in a totally different environment. Because she was brought up in Boston, Massachusetts, she didn’t have the same experiences and upbringing as other Haitian children that were born and raised in Haiti. As the author states, “Outside of our house, you are…

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    It is often interesting viewing your world and reality through the eyes of other people, listening as they decipher and make assumptions, none all that accurate, about the facts, while you 're left to live those facts. Americans have a lot of opinions about Haiti and about as many questions too. As soon as people know that I’m Haitian, I get flooded with questions that I highly doubt they want the answers to: “Why is Haiti so poor?” “Do you do voodoo?” “Where does all the relief money go?” “Why…

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    I would always go down to her house to play outside sometimes, and inside her house other times. Julie’s household consisted of herself, two brothers, one sister and only her mother. After spending time at Julie’s house, I realized that Haitians are actually very amazingly unique. This experience played a role in strengthening my multicultural awareness. The skill of multicultural awareness and diversity will be very important in the social work profession as it can greatly impact the…

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    The Haitian American culture has been a long-surviving and well-adapting culture. Starting with the indigenous people that occupied the island, before Christopher Columbus’ arrival in 1492. Columbus, being a conqueror for Spain, claimed the island of Haiti for King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella and named it Hispaniola meaning “little Spain”. From thenceforth the indigenous people of the island were killed off during gold conquests and the ruling of the Spanish by forced labor and diseases. With…

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    Caribbean. Because of this, it can be inferred that she is a spy from the U.S. even though she may not know it. Her observations are about what life is like for the Creoles, and non-Creoles, the positions of women in society, and what life was like in the urban areas and in the rural areas. The Creole’s life in St. Domingue before the revolution was good for some of the Creoles. Hassel comments on “One of them, whose annual income before the revolution was fifty thousand dollars … now lives…

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    women. Mentioned by Chopin early in the book, Edna was a Kentucky-born Presbyterian who married into the glamorous world of the wealthy Creole culture. This puts her at a disadvantage, as she never truly feels “at home” within the Creole society; she is simply included due to her marriage with Leonce, a well-to-do Creole. By marrying Leonce, she sacrifices her old lifestyle in Kentucky, to assimilate to the new expectations she has in New Orleans. As a wife, Edna does not have the opportunity…

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    There are events that occur all over the world every single day that make people question why life's so unfair. Pitt wrote about how there are times where it makes people feel as though bad things always have to happen to people who are most vulnerable. He explained in detail how there are children who are crying because of their dreadful lifestyle, and homeless families who would do absolutely anything and everything for shelter. His argument was basically that most of the time the worst things…

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