Fermi paradox

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    On 11 March 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and resulting tsunami occurred off the east coast of Japan. The tsunami resulted in extensive flooding along the east coast of Japan. Located near the towns of Ōkuma and Futaba on the east coast of Japan the Tokyo Electronic Power Company’s (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) sustained substantial damage. The FDNPP consists of six individual nuclear power reactors. Planned maintenance was being performed on reactors 4, 5 and 6.…

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    We live in a world where our possessions are a symbol of success. The bigger the car the louder that speaks about your bank account. Most people buy things as just something to do here in America. We are a particularly wasteful society. There is an uneven distribution of wealth and the poor can live right in the same neighborhood as the ultra rich. Most of the people here plan their lives around what will make them successful. They use the word success as a way of saying “well off enough to buy…

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    . One of the greatest problems utilitarians have had to face is that of measurement and evaluation. Since the majority of people gain their ideas of happiness from a process of abstraction. I.E "I have a general idea of what a plesaureable experience is, so I will attempt to find commonalities until I determine what exactly pleasure is." There are bound to be different interpretations of what pleasure is as humans tend to have different types of experiences they enjoy. The first piece of…

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    Utilitarianism is choosing the action that promotes the most happiness. This ethical theory is not the same as egoism because instead of thinking about your own happiness, you’d be thinking about the happiness of all. However, many people argue that utilitarianism is too demanding because it requires you to consider everyone’s happiness and do what brings the most happiness to the majority. For example, imagine that you work everyday, live alone and have no family or friends. If you were to give…

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    "The right action in any situation is the one that tends to produce the greatest possible balance of happiness over unhappiness for the greatest possible number."pg 130.It argues that the judge of one action is right or wrong, it depends on that we must look at the result that lead to the consequence of an action. People that they do not care about other factors, just because it leads to a good result, people can say that is the right thing to do. There are many different ways of thinking in…

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    Negative Utilitarianism

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    One issue with the quoted definition is that it only specifies happiness. The issue is that it omits suffering, pain, and other negative encounters. This is sometimes called “positive utilitarianism”, and can be appeared differently in relation to “negative utilitarianism”, which is all about obtaining the least suffering for the minimum number. Are either of these approaches an adequate version of the ethical theory? Should we be negative utilitarians or positive, or neither? I think these are…

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    Mill's Utilitarianism

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    Mill’s Utilitarianism is a seemingly simple yet quixotic approach to the issue of what makes a moral action. Mill believes that the goodness of a moral action depends on the amount of happiness it creates. However, critics find issue with this principle because if the end result of maximizing happiness is all that matters, unjust actions such as murder are moral as long as they maximize happiness. Despite his efforts of ameliorating this problem with his concept of justice, his use of justice…

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    John Mill Utilitarianism

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    In this situation according to Mill’s, “When given a choice between two acts, utilitarianism states that the act that should be chosen is the one that creates the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people.” The five workers have a higher utility than the one worker on the other track. According to mortality it is better to act in a way that benefits the most quantity of people, even if it causes harm to kill one to save five. Having to make a choice between who lives…

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    “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” is a short story by Ursula K. Le Guin. It was published in 1976 and is set in an ambiguous time period and location in a utopia called Omelas. This story discusses the idea of whether or not it is acceptable to destroy a small amount of people’s happiness for the good of the majority. The ethical theory behind this notion is utilitarianism: “that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons”…

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    Epicurean Vs Stoicism

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    We all tend to be happy in our lives. Some people compare happiness with factors like money, social status etc. while some mean satisfaction by happiness. I personally feel that it is our desires that control our happiness and these desires if controlled can lead to positive feelings like satisfaction. It has been rightly said, “Satisfaction is the death of desire.” Out of the four accounts that we covered, I would select the views of the Epicurean and the Stoic accounts for the description of…

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