Paradox of hedonism

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    The paradox of hedonism is the dilemma of a person who pursues happiness solely but never succeeds at achieving it. In this argument, accepting that happiness is our greatest good, it may still be irrational to aim for it directly. Hedonism is not negated by this argument because it simply states that pursing happiness directly might not be the best way to achieve it. There are people that delight or gain happiness at the expense of other people. In this case, Hedonism states that happiness gained from evil deeds can be just as effective in improving our lives as happiness that’s derived from virtue. The two worlds argument is an objection to Hedonism raised W.D. Ross. Hedonist argue that their view not about what makes a society or a world…

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    The paradox of hedonism states that to maximize happiness, sometimes is seems that a hedonist, should not be a hedonist. This is because if someone’s ultimate goal is to maximize happiness, they may look around and notice that people who are not following a strictly consequentialist lifestyle are in fact, happier than they are. They notice that others are engaging in relationships and commitments that create happiness. Railton provides a solution to the paradox of hedonism by once again…

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    We live in a world where our possessions are a symbol of success. The bigger the car the louder that speaks about your bank account. Most people buy things as just something to do here in America. We are a particularly wasteful society. There is an uneven distribution of wealth and the poor can live right in the same neighborhood as the ultra rich. Most of the people here plan their lives around what will make them successful. They use the word success as a way of saying “well off enough to buy…

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    Mill's Utilitarianism

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    Mill’s Utilitarianism is a seemingly simple yet quixotic approach to the issue of what makes a moral action. Mill believes that the goodness of a moral action depends on the amount of happiness it creates. However, critics find issue with this principle because if the end result of maximizing happiness is all that matters, unjust actions such as murder are moral as long as they maximize happiness. Despite his efforts of ameliorating this problem with his concept of justice, his use of justice…

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    John Mill Utilitarianism

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    In this situation according to Mill’s, “When given a choice between two acts, utilitarianism states that the act that should be chosen is the one that creates the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people.” The five workers have a higher utility than the one worker on the other track. According to mortality it is better to act in a way that benefits the most quantity of people, even if it causes harm to kill one to save five. Having to make a choice between who lives…

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    idea is the it is neither predictive nor determinate. Imagine you are in a room with nine other people and a poll is taken to determine whether Coke or Pepsi is more pleasureable. All nine other people vote that Coke is the superior brand. Does this somehow eliminate your undying devotion to Pepsi? While the other nine may gain vastly more pleasure through Coke it has absolutely zero relation to how much you enjoy Pepsi. If this argument is meant to be used as a guide for our actions it has…

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    According to society, when people are with their family and friends, they are exceeding 31% greater in school. Happiness helps kids to improve in school, however some people disagree with this argument. In his autobiography, by John Stuart Mill(1909), claims that people focus on happiness too much, and that people are displaying the wrong activities to find it. To support his thesis, John Stuart Mill creates his own opinion that the reader could relate to. The author wants to catch the reader’s…

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    1. The Greatest Happiness Principle discusses that the morally right action is the one that causes the greatest overall amount o pleasure ore least amount of suffering. The text, Fundamentals of Ethics explains it as the utilitarian outlook by saving that is required for us to create the greatest good for the greatest number (123).” In doing so, it is not always the action that benefits the most people but provides most pleasure. Secondly, we must choose the act that creates the greatest net…

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    “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” is a short story by Ursula K. Le Guin. It was published in 1976 and is set in an ambiguous time period and location in a utopia called Omelas. This story discusses the idea of whether or not it is acceptable to destroy a small amount of people’s happiness for the good of the majority. The ethical theory behind this notion is utilitarianism: “that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons”…

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    Epicurean Vs Stoicism

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    We all tend to be happy in our lives. Some people compare happiness with factors like money, social status etc. while some mean satisfaction by happiness. I personally feel that it is our desires that control our happiness and these desires if controlled can lead to positive feelings like satisfaction. It has been rightly said, “Satisfaction is the death of desire.” Out of the four accounts that we covered, I would select the views of the Epicurean and the Stoic accounts for the description of…

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