Northern Ireland

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    Friel’s 1980 play Translations tells the story of the fictional Donegal village of Baile Beag during the First Ordnance Survey of Ireland – a mapping of the country and anglicizing the Irish names of the places. The major theme of the play is language, and more specifically how the loss of a language can also help erase people’s history, culture and identity. In the 1800s Ireland was still a predominantly Gaelic-speaking nation. In 1975, only 2.7% of Irish speakers possessed a native speaker…

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    Irish Catholic Religion

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    Finally, Irish Catholics in Toronto were not completely without support, since Quebec embraced Irish Catholic culture through the dominance of Catholic cultural ideology amongst the Francophone population. This type of political, social, and economic support defined one reason why the Catholic Irish in Toronto was alienated, yet not without some resources to countermand the sectarian oppression of the Orange Order: In time the appearance and plight of these faminites became a lens through which…

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    The events that took place during the 1649 re-conquest of Ireland are perhaps some of the most controversial in Irish history. Popular history tells us that Oliver Cromwell was a genocidal maniac who led an army with the aim of wiping out the Irish population. Consequently, the name Oliver Cromwell still brings out negative emotions in Ireland today. Cromwell went to Ireland with the aim of seeking the loyalty of the population to the Westminster Parliament. Attacks on towns such as Drogheda…

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    to the condition Ireland was in. As a country that was making major profit from the potato and supplying to many, Britain should of naturally supplied a lot of resources in order to continue that economic growth. However, Britain believed that the Irish were lazy because of the success of the potato. So much hatred that they created a generalized persona of how Irish citizens act. (lazy,angry and stubborn) This led to Britain trying to justify their reason for abandoning Ireland as a way of…

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    seas of the world tumbled about her heart’. Thus, while Heaney offers a more postmodern investigation of identity as an external construct that allows him to resolve his sense of personal loss of heritage, Joyce focuses on the ‘moral history’ of Ireland struggling to assert itself in a pre-WWI zeitgeist and thus his treatment of Eveline’s inability to reconcile the loss of tradition is exemplary of Dublin’s paralysis in the early twentieth century. Thus, Joyce and Heaney’s treatment of personal…

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    "Every ethnic minority, in seeking its own freedom, helped strengthen the fabric of liberty in American life” -John F. Kennedy. The Irish immigrants did exactly so when they faced the obstacle of having to come to the United States. In 1740, the Irish faced famine and persecution, forcing them to immigrate to the United States in hope of better opportunities, but instead were discriminated against their Catholic practices. The Protestant Reformation was a conflict for the Irish Catholics but led…

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    Association did support the insurrection or not, despite the GAA having a non-party political stance for nearly a decade and a half previous. On Tuesday of Easter week 1916, the day after the insurrection had begun, Martial Law was proclaimed across Ireland, from which the holding of matches and sporting events was strictly prohibited. This lead to the activities of the GAA being suspended. Due to their roles in the insurrection approximately 3500 rebel were arrested and deported in the month…

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    dispassion for contemporary life, resulting in his nostalgic longing for the past and to be part of the Irish ancient legends – to transcend the life of the ordinary man. The red rose is used by Yeats as a nationalist symbol to represent a mythological Ireland, which shows Yeats’ sense of nationalism that only grew over the years. The poem starts with: “Red rose, proud rose, sad Rose of all my days!”. Here “all my days” gives the impression that the…

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    In Translations, by Brian Friel, language is used as a mechanism to feature the many issues of communication within the characters’ small Irish village. Throughout the play, Friel attempts to advocate for the Irish language because he believes that language represents one’s identity and historical background. Unfortunately, the town, and specifically the local school, have been appropriated by British officers, whose main goal is to transition the school into an entirely English-spoken school,…

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    Strongbow Research Paper

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    MacMurrough and invaded Ireland. Not wanting Strongbow to establish his own kingdom so close to England, King Henry II headed over to Ireland to establish himself as the head of the country, but he soon gave the lands of Leinster province to Strongbow as a gift for his service along with allowing Strongbow to be the leader of the new colony, as long as he answered to the king. This was the first English conquest of Ireland. The English never had an easy time ruling Ireland. That initial…

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