Northern Ireland

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    Ireland is a country built on war. Throughout its history, it has been conquered, divided, won and lost wars. Even today, the island remains separated into two parts, one belonging to the Republic of Ireland and the other a member of the United Kingdom. The most substantial factor early on was the religion and today the clash between the north and the south is on economic issues. The north, which is part of UK, fairs better economically than the south, which is the Republic of Ireland.…

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    significance of this move is that it took him South of the border with the Republic of Ireland, a haven away from the sectarian violence of the North. Inevitably, this could be assumed as Heaney’s deliberate removal from the political situation, however, Joshua Weiner wrote: While the move south seemed to some a deliberate withdrawal from a previous political commitment to fight the British presence in Ireland, Field Work indicates rather a growing commitment to stay engaged, but to do so by…

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    of the language. Many intellectuals and politicians had stressed the importance of it as one of the constitutive elements of Irishness. One clear example is Douglas Hyde who, already in the XXX, had claimed that it was necessary to “de-anglicize” Ireland in order to XXX. Gaelic was thus promoted and made compulsory in schools when the new State was born so that the number of native speakers would grow and the language would come alive again. Still, the project of a return to Irish proved to be…

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    This essay will focus on the many advantages and disadvantages of using the Confessio of St Patrick as a historical source. The Saint Patrick's Confessio is about Patrick, benefactor holy person of Ireland, who is a coordinating figure in that he gives a feeling of character to the entire of Ireland, and for its constituent parts, the Republic, the North and abroad. His social and profound legacy can be guaranteed by any settled political or social group on this island. Consistently, March…

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    formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force which was established a year previous. According to the Manifesto of the Irish Volunteers, the aim of the Irish Volunteers was to "secure and maintain the rights and liberties common to the whole people of Ireland". It is agreed by many historians including, Gerry White and Brendan O Shea that the Volunteers were made up of members of the Gaelic League, the Hibernian Knights and also the Sinn Fein movement. As many of the members of all three organisations…

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    Introduction: Second-generation Irish migrants in post-WWII England took up a variety of noteworthy hybrid-identities. This particular study of displacement is significant in the context of WWII, which produced twenty-seven million displaced persons and furthermore, is relevant in a present day context because of the continually increasing number of refugees worldwide. This essay compares the way that the two popular music bands made up of second-generation Irish migrants, The Pogues and The…

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    A Modest Proposal Summary

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    Eighteenth century Ireland was full of economic and religious struggles. The majority of the population was Roman Catholic, but then Protestants and Presbyterians came in, breaking up Catholic owned land and banishing the Roman Church hierarchy. Land was disputed between the groups in Parliament, and this showed some flaws in power in the Irish Parliament. (Baker) Protestants were at a clear advantage, being able to hold large estates and will land to their eldest son. Alternatively, Catholics…

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    Part I: Summary The history of Ireland is a vast and fascinating tale that has been translated into history, folk tales, mythology, and can be written and talked about for ages, which it has been. Now I could write a 100 page essay with a bibliography on this subject but of course it shall be condensed down to 6 pages. The two chapters/subjects I have chosen to write about from the “In Search of Ancient Ireland” text are chapter 9: Raiders from the Sea, and chapter 10: Viking Kings in Dublin. I…

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    financial state of Ireland (Porritt, 316). Although introduced in 1912, the bill passed the House of Commons but was not passed in the House of Lords. The Third This bill was never really passed due to the impending First World War. In 1920, a Fourth Home Rule Act was passed which partitioned Ireland into two sections; two of which we now have in the modern day world. These two jurisdictions were Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland. The latter of which evolved into the Republic of Ireland and…

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    W.B. Yeats’ Opinion of War W.B. Yeats was an Irish poet during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. He wrote following the belief of “spiritus mundi”, the spirit of the universe and the collective unconscious or memory, which influences him to write around different mythologies, despite being a Christian. “Spiritus Mundi” leads to two of the works that reflect his opinion regarding war and conquest. Through these two works, “Leda and the Swan” and “The Second Coming,” Yeats’ opinion of war as a…

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