Motor neuron

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    Motor Neuron Symptoms

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    The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a group of progressive neurological disorders that destroy motor neurons, the cells that control essential voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. Normally, messages from nerve cells in the brain (called upper motor neurons) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons to produce movements such as walking or chewing. Lower motor neurons control movement in the arms, legs, chest, face, throat, and tongue. Spinal motor neurons are also called anterior horn cells. Upper motor neurons are also called corticospinal neurons. Motor Neuron Disease Symptoms Motor neurone disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to decreased control of muscle movement and eventually paralysis. Symptoms can be mild at first and a tendency to drop things is often one of the first signs of the condition to develop. Symptoms usually begin in one area of the body. In some forms of the condition, the hands and feet may be the first regions affected, leading to difficulty picking things up or a tendency to trip, while in others individuals, it may be the…

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    It affects motor neurons. Motor neurons are cells that are in the brain, brain stem and spinal cord and their function is to carry an electrical signal to a muscle and trigger it to contract or relax. Medical terminology, a means without, my is muscle and trophic is nourishment. Lateral is pertaining to the side/direction that is affected and sclerosis is an abnormal condition of hardening. It was originally discovered in 1969 by Pathologist Jean-Martin Charcot, but because Lou Gehrig was known…

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    Motor neuron disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a disease affecting the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. This disease most often occurs in people between the age of 40 and 70. According to the ALS association, military veterans are twice as likely to be diagnosed with ALS. The reason for this is unknown. Currently there is no treatment that can halt or reverse the effects of the disease. The only medication for treatment can extend life by a few months at best.…

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    Problem Scott is a physician in charge of many terminally ill patients, including Sarah. Sarah has a motor neuron disease commonly known as ALS. Sarah has asked Scott for a drug that will reduce her pain but will shorten her life. Should Scott listen to Sarah and administer the drug, provide the standard care for patients with a terminal illness by not administering the drug, or pass Sarah and the decision off to another doctor? Input Scott, a medical doctor, is overseeing the care of a woman,…

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    HCSMA Case Studies

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    Case Study: Hereditary Canine Spinal Muscular Atrophy Genetic Background Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy (HCSMA) is proven to be an autosomal-dominate disease that affects most noticeably the Brittany spaniel (Pinter MJ, Waldeck RF, Wallace N, & Cork LC, Motor Unit Behavior in Canine Motor Neuron Disease, 1995). HCSMA originated as a spontaneous mutation in the Survivor Motor Neutron gene found in the purebred Brittany spaniel population (Ericsson. A & Rubin. C, 2012). Due to the…

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    ALS Synthesis Essay

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    is a loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, this disease is incurable therefore leading to paralysis and death. The particular two studies discussed will be based on how biomarkers (a tool used by scientist to determine the biological pathways and the progress of the disease) can help find a cure for ALS by creating an effective drug and most importantly early detection. Mice were used as a transgenic model once they had SOD1 G93A gene mutation they discovered the mice developed…

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    Some experiments were aimed at finding how SOD1 becomes pro-apoptotic (promoting programmed cell death) due to the fact that healthy SOD1 are against programmed cell death (Pasinelli et al. 2004). The pro-apoptotic characteristic of mutant SOD1 is demonstrated in vivo and in vitro. The mitochondria inside cells firmly control apoptosis, and the mutant SOD1 that aggregates inside mitochondria triggers the programmed cell death of motor neurons (Pasinelli et al. 2004). One experiment studied…

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    Jenbrassik Case Study

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    1. The Jendrassik maneuver played a major role on the patellar reflex. One of the prevailing hypotheses has to deal with the alpha-gamma co-activation theory. It states that the alpha motor neurons activates the motor tone, which leads to the spindles providing feedback to the brain. This process is done by the gamma motor neurons, who are in charge of controlling the stimulation of the cerebellum. Also, both the alpha and gamma motor neurons meet at the same effector muscles. Furthermore, when…

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    tool that is used for the process of clinical reasoning. This paper will discuss management of Motor neurone disease using the clinical reasoning cycle as a framework. However, the first step of the clinical reasoning cycle will not be considered as this paper will discuss Motor neurone disease (MND) in general instead of being based on a patient case. After gathering information on Motor neurone disease pathophysiology,…

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    Assignment #2 What are the 3 major types of neurons? How are they functionally different? Why are the functional differences important? There are 3 major neurons that the nervous system uses to carry information throughout the body; sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Each type of neuron, all functionally different, interacts with the central nervous system, the brain, and the muscles of the body. Some vary in shape and sizes as well as differ in simplicity and complexity.…

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