Cerebellum

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    Cerebellum And Autism

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    The Cerebellum and its connection to autism Many scientists and researchers have accredited one of the causes of autism to the reduced number of Purkinje cells in the cerebral cortex. Purkinje cells play a vital role in the transmission of signals to the cerebral cortex that control Purkinje cells are what make practice perfect because they can be condition with lots of repetitive movement, which can explain the importance of routine for most kids with autism (Purves, Augustine, Fitzpatrick, et al, 2001). Loss of Purkinje cells can result in changed cerebral cortex signals that may be associated with some symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (Hoxha et al., 2013). In an MRI study done by the team of Jeong, Tiwari, Behen, Chugani (2014), the…

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    In the past it was believed that the cerebellum received information from various areas of the cortex and projected information to the primary motor cortex via thalamus, thus fine-tuning a movement (19). It was also believed that the Basal ganglia was involved with the inhibition and selection of action commands (19). These views suggest the involvement of both cerebellum and Basal ganglia(BG) in purely motor function. But that is not the case, recent studies have found a connection between the…

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    Cerebellum In Art

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    Anne, the landscape artist who is standing at her easel, painting with her right hand, looking out the window towards the garden, and listening to classical music all at the same time is using many parts of her brain. One part of her brain that is being used in the cerebellum because she is painting with her right hand. The cerebellum allows her to coordinate the movements of her hand to allow her to paint. She is also using the hypothalamus by looking out of the window because it is giving her…

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    Cognitive Effects of Cerebellar Dysfunction The cerebellum is regarded as an essential neural structure for motor control. At a tenth of the brain’s volume, it contains the majority of neurons in the brain. Many cortical areas project into the primate cerebellum; these include the primary motor and prefrontal cortices. Damage to the cerebellum is known to result in impaired motor function. Patients with cerebellar lesions may exhibit ataxia, unbalanced gait; dysmetria, lack of coordination in…

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    Recent research now connects reduced regional volumes of the cerebellum with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder. Stimulants are currently the most common method of treating this mental disorder, but what effect do they have on the brain and how are they subduing the symptoms? Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD for short, is a very common childhood mental disorder, with symptoms ranging from difficulty paying attention to general hyperactivity. Many previous…

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    As the cerebellum began to grow, the complexity of cognition used to make tools also grew. Thus instead of having short, mode 1 tools that were very limited on the number of tasks that could be accomplished, later hominids, such as Homo heidelbergensis, possessed enough cognitive evolution to better adapt and change the way that they gathered food, by developing mode 3 tools, which were used to gather different ranges of food more efficiently. From a human behavioral ecology…

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    The Neuron Doctrine

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    In essence, he proposed that the cerebellum is a principal agent of learning motor skills. He thought that the cerebrum recruited the cerebellum in order to automate its motor commands so that a relatively simple or incomplete command from the cerebrum would be elaborated and completed by the cerebellum after motor learning. Further, he proposed that the cerebellum is a site of learning because it contains many neurons and synapses, most of which are probably modifiable, and that absent…

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    Alcohol Affects The Brain

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    depending on specific factors. These factors include height, weight, gender and age. Alcohol affects a person’s brain, liver, and heart. Alcohol affects the brain by causing the neurotransmitters in the brain to relay information too slowly, and this makes a person who is drinking feel tired. The slowing down of neurotransmitters also trigger mood and behavioral changes that include depression and memory loss. A particular neurotransmitter is susceptible to small amounts of alcohol and it is…

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    Jenbrassik Case Study

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    1. The Jendrassik maneuver played a major role on the patellar reflex. One of the prevailing hypotheses has to deal with the alpha-gamma co-activation theory. It states that the alpha motor neurons activates the motor tone, which leads to the spindles providing feedback to the brain. This process is done by the gamma motor neurons, who are in charge of controlling the stimulation of the cerebellum. Also, both the alpha and gamma motor neurons meet at the same effector muscles. Furthermore, when…

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    definition of bilingual is to be “able to speak two languages with the facility of a native speaker.” Specifically focusing on bilingual people, how does currently knowing two languages benefit people through the economic and educational perspective? The knowledge of how a person knows the languages they speak fluently or are currently learning to speak all leads to the brain. The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. The brain can be separated into three units: the forebrain,…

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