Alcoholism

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    Audacity Of Alcoholism

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    Imagine walking home from a night out with friends and you pass a bar. You look inside and see a man with his hands around an empty glass, holding on to it like his life depends on it. That man spends all of his nights like that, drinking and spending his money on a temporary escape. This is one of the many forms alcoholism comes in. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, this is the chilling reality of 16.6 million adults over the age of eighteen in the United States alone. “An estimated 20 to 40 percent of patients in large urban hospitals are there because of illnesses that have been caused or made worse by their drinking” (pubs.niaaa.nih.gov). Alcohol is consumed by many people in the U.S. and crimes such…

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    Alcoholism In Society

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    down at least once a week, to enjoy an alcoholic beverage. A great amount of these people fail to realize that drinking is what leads to rampant behavior, endangering the lives of others by drunk driving, and in the long run, addiction. These people are only thinking of the short-term effects, and not the negative long-term consequences. People who commonly turn to alcohol, ultimately begin to neglect their families and other responsibilities, therefore wrecking the lives of loved ones and…

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    Alcoholism Disease

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    It should not be forgotten that alcoholism itself is a disease. The chemistry of alcohol allows it to affect nearly every cell in the human body. After prolonged exposure to alcohol the brain adapts to the changes it makes and becomes dependent on it. The severity of this disease is influenced by such factors as genetics, psychology, culture and physical pain. It is said that the risk of alcoholism in sons of alcoholic fathers is twenty-five percent. One of the main problems with quitting…

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    Case Study # 4 “As long as alcoholism remains essentially a moral problem, it will be met with the weapons of moral issues -- condemnation and punishment or, at best, shame, exclusion and ostracism,” (Yvelin Gardner, National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, 1950). Alcoholism in the workforce is very real issue for many employers. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD), a national survey found that almost 25% of American workers admitted to drinking…

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    Alcoholism Addiction

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    Substance-induced disorders is defined as “syndromes and consequences produced as a result of recurrent ingestion, they consist of intoxication, withdrawal, and a series of substance-induced mental disturbances (Lyons, 2014, p322). Alcoholism is a complex individual and social disorder which cuts across many areas. It is effected by the fields of medicine, physiology, psychology, social welfare, religion, penology, education, politics, and economics. All the different fields have a different…

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    Alcoholism In Canada

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    Alcohol should be illegal in Canada because it can cause many negative impacts to our lives. Today, people believe that drinking alcohol is a way to forget about stress and anxiety that is bothering them. As a result, a tremendous amount of people is getting addicted to alcohol. However, drinking can caused constant misfortune to one’s life. When an individual becomes dependent on alcohol, it may lead to consequences including health problems, mental issues and social influences. The…

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    Alcoholism In Elderly

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    Alcoholism is a serious health issue that affects millions of people and their loved ones every day. “Alcohol dependence refers to a medical illness characterized by loss of control, preoccupation with alcohol, continued alcohol use despite adverse consequences, and physiological symptoms such as withdrawal and tolerance” (Dawoodi & De Sousa, 2012, 208). Unfortunately, as more people continue to get older they come to rely on alcohol for the perceived physical and psychological benefits (Dawoodi…

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    Alcoholism In America

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    Alcohol is the third leading cause of preventable deaths in the United States. Each year an estimated 87,000 deaths occur due to alcohol(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013 Alcohol consumption in the United States has continued to remain popular despite all of the negative effects. Alcoholism is defined as A chronic, progressive pathological condition, mainly affecting the nervous and digestive systems, caused by the excessive and habitual consumption of alcohol (The American…

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    Teenage Alcoholism

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    There is a problem in our country and it is underage drinking. In this essay I will be talking about teenage alcoholism, how it is dangerous, the risks, and how to detect if your child is drinking. There are many dangers to drinking at a young age and it is also illegal. Alcohol is considered a drug because it reduces a person’s ability to think. All states have underage drinking problems and drinking and driving it is a growing problem in the United States. Teenage Alcoholism is when people…

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    Alcoholism Sociology

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    Alcoholism As social beings, people possess behavior which makes up the subject matter of sociology. According to Giddens and Griffiths, sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups, and societies (4). Sociology cultivates people’s imagination by explaining human nature and the reasons behind individual and collective actions. In this regard, a sociologist is a social scientist who gives a wider context to personal circumstances as he or she studies institutions and the growth of…

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