Monody

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    In opera, the composer is the dramatist. In opera the music interprets, crystallizes, and intensifies the expressive meaning of the words, far beyond anything with the words alone are capable of (Greenberg, 2009, L11, 8:35). During the transitory period of the Renaissance and Baroque eras, the tremendous increase in the popularity of secular stage drama punctuated by musical intermezzos (music played between the acts of stage plays) invariably ignited opera into existence. As discussed by Greenberg (2009), the intermezzo and the madrigal evolved and flourished during the late sixteenth century and led directly to the invention of opera. ‘The intermezzi had music, they accentuated the dramatic and emotional content of the play in which they were interpolated and all the leading Italian composers wrote them” (L29, 17:30). By the late sixteenth century these intermittency, which were so well received, began to increase in the spectacle of its production and musical forces; audiences craved for more and the composers at the time were more than happy to oblige them. As discussed by Greenberg (2009), the Florentine composer Emilio de ' Cavalieri wrote the very first intermezzo in which he referred to its genre as an intermedio/madrigal for the purpose of the opening ceremony for the wedding of Grand Duke Ferdinand de ' Medici and Christine of Lorraine in 1589 entitled Dalle Piu Alter Sfere (from the highest sphere). This musical work contains four instrumental parts with the…

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    Baroque Era

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    Contrast became a massive factor in music or this time to truly make it stick out from the crowd as something new and exciting. The differences between loud and soft, solo and ensemble (as in the concerto), different instruments and timbres all play an important role in many baroque compositions. Then we have monody and the advent of the basso continuo. In previous musical eras, a piece of music tended to consist of a single melody, perhaps with an improvised accompaniment, or several melodies…

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    During the medieval times, which was the period between c1150-c1400, the music created started out in the form of a monody, which meant music was written as a single line. This is the earliest period where we can be pretty sure of how the music that survived actually sounded. The manuscripts for music during this time were often influenced by religion through the churches, which was a common place of learning. It was during the 11th to 13th century where monody music turned into organum music,…

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    The bells are made of grim, heavy iron. Iron emphasizes how heavy, cold and lifeless the world becomes and is showcased in the stanza. These are the last bells that call when someone has died, far from the happy jingling Silver Bells. The speaker included “What a world of solemn thought their monody compels!” The word “monody” is like a single melody but also the sounds of a funeral song. This gives readers idea of the quick sense of death, how a fast a rhythm or song is over, as fast as life.…

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    When life brightens up, it can always reach back to darkness. Edgar Allan Poe demonstrates this throughout the poem “The Bells”. Poe starts the poem off with silver bells making us remember the happy memories big and small in our life. Then Poe goes on to describe golden bells as joyus by saying, “How they ring out their delight...what a gush of euphony voluminously wells!” This represents a time in life that is happy, peaceful, and where life seems perfect. Next the narrator says, “What a tale…

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    Death is inevitable and should be accepted. In stanza two of “The Bells”, Poe mentions how the bells tell “Of the rapture that impels.” According to some believers, the rapture is the transporting of believers to heaven at the Second Coming of Christ, which is the end of times. This means that the end of time is pushed forward by the bells. Also, in stanza three, Poe mentions that “the ear distinctly tells.” The line before says that danger is always moving, and that the people know this. This…

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    For example, the author starts the poem off happily. In the first stanza, he writes, “Silver bells! What a world of merriment their melody foretells!” He does this to explain the cheerfulness that someone may feel in their childhood. However, as the poem comes to an end, the tone starts to get darker. Towards the end of the poem, the author writes in a dark tone. In the last stanza, he writes. “Iron bells! What a world of solemn their monody compels!” In these lines, the author demonstrates that…

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    J. S. Bach Research Paper

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    to 1750 and was predominantly focused on Italian culture. Many forms of music during the period were originated in Italy such as the cantata, concerto, sonata, oratorio, and opera. Though, other European nations also had a great deal of influence on music such as France and Germany. There are certain characteristics that are associated with the music from the baroque era that are unique to the period and the composers. In the Baroque period, contrast became a relevant addition to compositions.…

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    death as a result. “The Bells” is a dark poem that describes life as a terrible progression of pain, sorrow and death. This poem is quite sobering. At the beginning of the poem; however, the bells that Poe describes are subtle jingle bells, which arguably resemble the early and more infantile stages of life. These bells then metamorphosize into happy wedding bells, but the poem only becomes more terrible. In the third stanza of the poem, Poe states, “Hear the loud alarum bells - Brazen bells!…

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    I feel as though this part is more about the burial of the main character rather than the actual death itself. “What a world of solemn thought their monody compels!” (Stanza 4, line 3) This line gives me the image of a cemetery where those who are alive are mourning the dead who lie silent. The people in the steeple watch, parted from their recently deceased loved one, “And the people- ah, the people-/They that dwell up in the steeple/All Alone.” (Stanza 4, lines 10-12). Edgar Allan Poe goes…

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