John Ridley Stroop

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    Introduction The Stroop Effect, named after John Ridley Stroop, is a phenomenon most know for reading the color that the word is written in, but not the actual word (See figure 1). According to Stroop, “it demonstrates the interference of working memory and the reaction time of a task, often used to illustrate the nature of automatic processing versus conscious visual control” (Stroop, 1935). John Stroop first published his findings in 1935 based on 3 experimental research theories (See figure 2). His first theory compared reading a list of words in black ink while reading the same list of words in different colors. The results showed that there was little to no interference and time difference in the time it took subjects to read both list (Stroop, 1935). He then compared naming the colors…

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    You're probably thinking, “What even is the ‘Stroop Effect’”? Well, the Stroop effect is classified as how our minds work in telling the difference between naming color words, and naming the word’s colors. It was discovered by John Ridley Stroop (Stroop, J.R.) in 1935. And it studies the the interference in verbal reactions. Many people wonder why this still fascinates psychologists. Part of the answer is the effect taps into the essential operations of cognition, which helps us figure out how…

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    The Stroop Test

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    This paper explains the effects of the famous Stroop Test, what it means, and why it stumps so many minds. The Stroop Test brings into the field many questions about how the brain works, like whether humans can identify words faster than colors or vice versa. The fascination people have with this test is not because it is easy and fun, but because it is confusing and tricky. A simple task of identifying the color of a word when the color does not match the word seems like a piece of cake…

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    Stroop Task Lab Report

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    In measuring the effects of emotion on reaction time, we used a modified version of the Stroop task (Stroop, 1935). In the Stroop task, participants are presented with color words that are not printed in the same color they are spelling. The participants are required to identify the ink color that a color word is printed in and then move on to the next word until they complete the task. Reaction times in this experiment are measured in milliseconds and recorded. In the modified version, also…

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    The Stroop Effect

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    Stroop Effect Report My science fair project focuses on the Stroop Effect and how to eliminate it. Information on this subject is extremely limited but I will try my best to answer the research questions that I have put forth. HISTORY The Stroop effect was named after a man called John Ridley stroop. He discovered this phenomenon in the 1930’s. He had people try to name the color in which a word was printed, meaning that if you had the word “blue” printed in red ink, you would say “red”. Stroop…

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    In 1935, John Ridley Stroop discovered the Stroop Effect. It is an experiment based on the amount of time it takes to identify the color of words that are printed on paper. The attempt to identify the color in which the words are printed takes an extended amount of time when the colored word contrasts from the color of the ink rather than when the colored word is identical to the ink color it is printed in. This is also known as “interference.” Humans are so talented at reading that they can…

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    Stroop Effect Experiment

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    findings, the results showed a statistical difference between conditions. Due to inference, the incongruent condition took a longer reaction time because it conflicted with our cognitive processing. This experiment was widely interpreted on Stroop, Windes, and Hintzman, D. L., Carre, F. A., Eskridge, V. L., Owens, A. M., Shaff, S. S., Sparks, M. E. Numerical Stroop Effect Response: What you see is not Always What you Guess…

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    Stroop Effect: Color and Word Naming John Ridley (J.R.) Stroop, as described by C. Macleod (1991), was born into a farming community and was not expected to live past infancy, so he was sheltered by his family to protect him. Due to not having to do heavy farm work, Stroop focused on his education and graduated top of his class. He eventually received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology. Stroop performed the Stroop effect experiment as his dissertation, which was then actually not rediscovered…

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    Studies done by Stroop (1992) and Windes (1968) suggest that the Stroop effect occurs when performing a naming task which impacts reaction times. In the Stroop (1992) study found that color naming had a slower reaction time when the color words were printed in a different color, but even slower reaction time occurred when the color and word were completely separate from one another. The current experiment used Stroop task to determine the impacts of reaction times to test the hypothesis to see…

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    The Loman Family

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    Arthur Miller, author of Death of a Salesman, describes a family that exemplifies a failure of the 1940s. The Loman family ultimately falls to pieces after it is evident their relationships with one another are unhealthy and create more issues. Some readers believe that their crash is a result of insecurity and that things such as expectations are not contributing factors, but one will soon see why other views are more accurate. The demise of the Loman family can be attributed to the pressure…

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