Codependent No More

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    The self-health book Codependent No More is in black and white by Melody Beattie, (1987) a recovering alcoholic, who became a well-known author It is my viewpoint after reading the book Codependent No More, defining by means of symptoms are vital in helping the codependent, to form their own help direction. While Beattie on the road to recovery, she advanced into a recovery councilor. One day on the job, her superiors asked her to form a support group for the non-addict partner in the year of 1976, (Beattie, 1987) pg. 1. Her thoughts were reluctant, on the topic, and the group. She initiated to educate herself, on codependents’ with very little theory out there, she was not sure on the subject. The codependent material was minimal even though she had a challenging time formulating and researching a definition, Beattie ultimately comprehended that the codependent had similar traits, they went through suffering, absent the alcohol or other drugs. (Pg.5) she detected the non-user had one specific trait they shared: they rationalized their thoughts by the approach of the helping of others, in the consequence of their abolishing their own life. Beattie realizes, the codependent helping thoughts were irrational and fixated with the succeeding a wide variety of symptoms after the helping; angry, guilt and low self-worth.…

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    value and identity. She goes into detail on how a codependent is a person who believes that their happiness is derived from other people or one particular person. This eventually leads to obsessing or controlling the behavior of the person that is believed to be making them happy. Sadly, this can result in relationships with drug and alcohol lovers. The author also shares many of the Twelve-Step Al-Anon program objectives as it relates to recovery. Chapter three spoke to me the most. I like…

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    “Tradition, long conditioned thinking, can bring about a fixation, a concept that one readily accepts, perhaps not with a great deal of thought.” –Jiddu Kirshnamurti. When there is a strong tradition followed in a community, it is a major component in shaping the citizens beliefs. It is often the base for the society’s cultural and societal norms. This is regarded in Alden Nowlan’s play The Dollar Woman during multiple circumstances. As well as in the short story “The Boat” by Alistair MacLeod,…

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    Examples Of Cultural Norms

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    In like manner, many of the Japanese people also file their teeth for aesthetic reasons and it is considered attractive. By the same token, these practices will be considered strange to different outsider groups such as our own. Agreed upon by many researchers, is the fact that there are at least four kinds of speak of at least four types of cultural norms which are; folkways, mores, taboos, and laws. Violating these religious or cultural laws and taboos can result in isolation and rejections by…

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    The author of Brave New World, Aldous Huxley incorporates a range of ideas which relate to todays youth. The story involves a outsider in the World State and the juxtaposition between these two conflicting views allows the author to represent different ideas, heavily related to societal conventions. The societal system used in the book is a society containing many troubling aspects in our society and making them the crux of the society allowing the problems to become more emulated. The idea of…

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    Schizophrenia is a common and about 1 in 100 people will develop schizophrenia with some cultural differences. It usually develops during late adolescence and is more common in men than women. The onset of schizophrenia is normally in the form of an ‘acute episode’. When this happens, the individual may feel panic along with anger or depression during this episode. It can be a shocking experience because they are not expecting it or prepared for it. There are many explanations as to why people…

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    Essay On Conform Norms

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    I find myself recognizing more and more of our norms that are being broken that I came to just shrug off before. Two weeks ago a young man and a mother displayed an example of a norm violation while I was working. This young man was not out of his teenage years and appeared to have mental disabilities. His mother, a regular at the restaurant, makes sure to carefully attend to…

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    Individualism is a commonly sought after truth in this world. For it is when this sense of individuality is obtained that one becomes empowered. Greater concepts that could be drawn from this is that acting with such originality could give you the opportunity to have extensive views, learn new things and make a difference. In To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch is a lawyer who took on a very important case. In the case he defends Tom Robinson, who is a black man accused of…

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    talks about the difference between shame culture and guilt culture on campuses. Mr. Brooks also talks about how even the normal shame culture has change within the college aged students. Throughout the article the author brings us back to his theory that “campuses are awash in moral judgment.” The author brings in social media as a way to back up his thinking stating that “social media has created a new sort of shame culture.” Brooks also goes on to talk about how the shame culture works within…

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    Gabriel assumes his position appropriately. He recognizes Gretta as property that needs to be protected, and he attempts to stifle his desire to take Gretta as he please (in a true animalistic sense). To briefly digress, this is an instance where Gabriel thinks in a dualistic sense. He looks to protect Gretta, but also master her. A delicate balance between good and bad ways of thinking. While Gabriel struggles to hold on to gender norms and roles, Gretta is arguably letting go. It is possible…

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